A superior vena cava to right pulmonary artery shunt for severe right ventricular outflow tract stenosis caused by an unresectable cardiac tumor

We report the case of a 47-year-old man who was diagnosed with severe right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) stenosis due to a space-occupying lesion; the diagnosis was made using computed tomography. He underwent mass reduction, pulmonary valve replacement, and RVOT reconstruction with a bovine pericardial patch. The pathological diagnosis was undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma originating from the myocardium. As the mass resection was incomplete, he received heavy particle therapy. He did not want to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Four months later, severe RVOT stenosis recurred because the residual mass had invaded the prosthetic valve in the pulmonic position and one of the cusps was fixed in the closed position. He presented with dyspnea and marked lower leg edema. We performed superior vena cava (SVC) to right pulmonary artery (RPA) shunting as a palliative operation to improve his heart failure symptoms. After surgery, his symptoms improved; his hemodynamics have been stable for one year. SVC-RPA shunting is a palliative operation but can be used to effectively treat severe RVOT stenosis caused by unresectable cardiac tumors.
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
The incidence of primary cardiac tumors is very rare (0.02% of all cardiac tumors), and the majority of them are benign, with myxoma being the most common.1 The most common primary malignant tumor is sarcoma.2,3 Despite its rarity, a cardiac tumor should be an important differential diagnosis when patients present with critical cardiac symptoms, including heart failure, arrhythmia, or emboli.1 Regardless of the histologic nature of cardiac tumors, they can cause obstruction, stenosis, regurgitation, and emboli.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: E-Challenge Source Type: research
We present a case of an 85-year-old patient who underwent clinical work-up for chronic heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism, until she was diagnosed with a cardiac mass that was histologically identified as sarcoma. The aim of this educational case report is to raise awareness of cardiac masses and to point out diagnostic hints towards a cardiac tumor on chest X-ray, coronary angiography, echocardiography, and chest CT. Moreover, the vital role of cardiac magnetic resonance for the diagnosis of a cardiac mass is highlighted.
Source: Journal of Radiology Case Reports - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
We present a case of an 85-year-old patient who underwent clinical work-up for chronic heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism, until she was diagnosed with a cardiac mass that was histologically identified as sarcoma. The aim of this educational case report is to raise awareness of cardiac masses and to point out diagnostic hints towards a cardiac tumor on chest X-ray, coronary angiography, echocardiography, and chest CT. Moreover, the vital role of cardiac magnetic resonance for the diagnosis of a cardiac mass is highlighted.
Source: Journal of Radiology Case Reports - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Texas Heart Institute Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Tex Heart Inst J Source Type: research
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a large right ventricular UPS who presented with signs of right-sided heart failure. Preoperative imaging was suggestive of a myxoma; however, histopathologic evaluation of the specimen confirmed a diagnosis of UPS. Microscopic margins of the specimen were positive, and adjuvant chemotherapy was given. We discuss diagnostic and treatment considerations for this unusual cardiac tumor. <Learning objective: The diagnosis and treatment of primary cardiac tumors are challenging. Noninvasive imaging often lacks the sensitivity and specificity to differentiate between benign and m...
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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