Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 in Breast Cancer: Technical Aspects, Prognostic Implications, and Predictive Value

AbstractIn the light of recent advances in the immunotherapy field for breast cancer (BC) treatment, especially in the triple‐negative subtype, the identification of reliable biomarkers capable of improving patient selection is paramount, because only a portion of patients seem to derive benefit from this appealing treatment strategy. In this context, the role of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD‐L1) as a potential prognostic and/or predictive biomarker has been intensively explored, with controversial results. The aim of the present review is to collect available evidence on the biological relevance and clinical utility of PD‐L1 expression in BC, with particular emphasis on technical aspects, prognostic implications, and predictive value of this promising biomarker.Implications for Practice.In the light of the promising results coming from trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors for breast cancer treatment, the potential predictive and/or prognostic role of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD‐L1) in breast cancer has gained increasing interest. This review provides clinicians with an overview of the available clinical evidence regarding PD‐L1 as a biomarker in breast cancer, focusing on both data with a possible direct impact on clinic and methodological pitfalls that need to be addressed in order to optimize PD‐L1 implementation as a clinically useful tool for breast cancer management.
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: research

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Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Aging - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Aging (Albany NY) Source Type: research
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Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
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