Granulomatous inflammation diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration biopsy

Publication date: November–December 2019Source: Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology, Volume 8, Issue 6Author(s): Dianna L. Ng, Ronald BalassanianIntroductionFine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a minimally invasive biopsy technique and an important tool for diagnosing infectious diseases. Rapid onsite evaluation allows for triage for ancillary testing, including microbiologic cultures. We aimed to determine the etiology of granulomatous inflammation diagnosed by FNAB by correlating with culture results and clinical history.Materials and methodsA 16-year retrospective review of cases diagnosed as “granulomatous inflammation” or “granuloma” was performed at the Departments of Pathology at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center and University of California, San Francisco.ResultsA total of 339 FNABs diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation were identified. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in 117 of 339 cases (34.5%) and non-necrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in 222 of 339 cases (65.5%). A pathogen was detected in 100 of 339 (29.5%) FNABs by either cytomorphology, special stains, or culture, or a combination of more than one test. Of the 100 pathogen-positive cases, necrotizing granulomatous inflammation was seen in 50 of 100 (50%) and non-necrotizing granulomatous inflammation was identified in 50 of 100 (50%) cases. Culture results were available in 239 cases and positive in 7...
Source: Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research

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A 70 year-old male farmer and carpenter, presented to the Emergency Department from our Hospital in Northern Mexico with a 6 month history of a painless, right scrotal mass. The patient referred 3 recurrent urinary tract infections one year before with associated mild obstructive symptoms. A primary care physician evaluated him 2 weeks before, and initiated a course of empiric antibiotics with Levofloxacin. After 10 days of therapy without improvement he was referred to our clinic. His personal history revealed Rheumatoid Arthritis since 1995 under chronic treatment with Methotrexate and Prednisone, Benign Prostatic Hyperp...
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: Journal of the American Society of CytopathologyAuthor(s): Dianna L. Ng, Ronald BalassanianAbstractIntroductionFine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a minimally invasive biopsy technique and is an important tool for diagnosing infectious diseases. Rapid on-site evaluation allows for triage for ancillary testing, including microbiologic cultures. We aim to determine the etiology of granulomatous inflammation diagnosed by FNAB by correlating with culture results and clinical history.Materials and methodsA 16-year retrospective review of cases diagnosed as “gran...
Source: Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Of the 8,000 Californians who will contract Valley Fever this year, most will recover without treatment, and those with more serious cases will require an antifungal medication that clears the infection. But a few will experience a life-threatening form of the disease that ravages the body for reasons unknown.Now, an experimental treatment used by physicians atUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital that cured a 4-year-old boy may provide an explanation — and a method for manipulating the immune system to combat not just Valley Fever, but a host of infections.In February 2018, the Gonzalez-Martinez family traveled 200...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Discussion Transplantation is not a common problem for primary care physicians but when a child’s disease has progressed to end-stage organ failure, transplantation can be the only treatment available. While the primary care provider usually is not involved in the daily management of patients before, during and after transplantation, they can be involved in many areas. These can include providing appropriate primary and acute care, ordering and obtaining necessary medical tests, medications and equipment, assisting with medical insurance, providing medical history and records to consultants, translating medical infor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusion Methanogens are important players in the carbon cycle of hypersaline habitats. However, not much is known about the characteristics of methanogens from the deep-sea brine habitats of the Red Sea and no cultures existed. In this study, we describe a novel isolate (strain RSK) from the BSI of Kebrit Deep of the Red Sea representing a novel species within the genus Methanohalophilus. In order to understand why species of the genus Methanohalophilus are successful in chemically diverse hypersaline environments, we analyzed and compared the genomic inventory among five Methanohalophilus species to elucidate genomica...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion In conclusion, QMAC-DST is a rapid and accurate alternative to conventional DST. Additionally, QMAC-DST is highly valuable in cases of treatment failure or contact history for MDR-TB patients because it can test various first- and second-line drugs. This fully automated, high-throughput DST system is particularly suitable for high-capacity laboratories. Author Contributions M-NK and SHK equally contributed to whole processing of this study as a corresponding authors. SL led the experiments and wrote this manuscript. DC, YC, EJ, SYK, HK, HJK, JC, HS, and BJ contributed to performance of the experiments and dat...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of the ReviewInternational travel continues to steadily increase, including leisure travel, travel to one ’s country of origin to visit friends and relatives, travel for service work, and business travel. Travelers with HIV may have an increased risk for travel-associated infections. The pre-travel medical consultation is an important means of assessing one’s risk for travel-related health issues. T he aim of this review is to provide an update on key health considerations for the HIV-infected traveler.Recent FindingsLike all travelers, the HIV-infected traveler should adhere to behavioral preca...
Source: Current Infectious Disease Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Lung cavitation may be due to infectious or noninfectious pathologic processes. The latter category includes nonmalignant conditions, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and malignant conditions, such as squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Infectious etiologies that produce lung cavitation usually cause chronic illness, although some, particularly pyogenic bacteria, may produce acute cavitary disease. Tuberculosis is the most common cause of chronic pulmonary infection with cavitation. The goal of this review was to highlight a selection of the better-known infectious agents, other than tuberculosis, that can cause ...
Source: Journal of Thoracic Imaging - Category: Radiology Tags: Symposium Review Articles Source Type: research
Chronic meningitis is a syndrome defined by the presence of clinical signs and symptoms of meningitis or meningoencephalitis with a persisting cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis that are present for at least 4 weeks. The differential diagnosis is broad, with categories including neoplastic, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders and central nervous system (CNS) infections. The exact frequency of the different etiologies often varies tremendously across reports; however, among most institutions, common infectious causes of chronic meningitis includeMycobacterium tuberculosis and fungal men...
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
More News: Cancer & Oncology | Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) | Cytology | Fine Needle Aspiration | Infectious Diseases | Microbiology | Pathology | Tuberculosis