Chapter Two - Clarifying the neurobehavioral sequelae of moderate drinking lifestyles and acute alcohol effects with aging

Publication date: 2019Source: International Review of Neurobiology, Volume 148Author(s): Sara Jo Nixon, Ben LewisAbstractEpidemiological estimates indicate not only an increase in the proportion of older adults, but also an increase in those who continue moderate alcohol consumption. Substantial literatures have attempted to characterize health benefits/risks of moderate drinking lifestyles. Not uncommonly, reports address outcomes in a single outcome, such as cardiovascular function or cognitive decline, rather than providing a broader overview of systems. In this narrative review, retaining focus on neurobiological considerations, we summarize key findings regarding moderate drinking and three health domains, cardiovascular health, Type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cognition. Interestingly, few investigators have studied bouts of low/moderate doses of alcohol consumption, a pattern consistent with moderate drinking lifestyles. Here, we address both moderate drinking as a lifestyle and as an acute event.Review of health-related correlates illustrates continuing inconsistencies. Although substantive reductions in risk for cardiovascular and T2D events are reported, robust conclusions remain elusive. Similarly, whereas moderate drinking is often associated with enhanced cognition and lower dementia risk, few benefits are noted in rates of decline or alterations in brain structure. The effect of sex/gender varies across health domains and by consumption levels. For example, women appe...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: International Review of NeurobiologyAuthor(s): Sara Jo Nixon, Ben LewisAbstractEpidemiological estimates indicate not only an increase in the proportion of older adults, but also an increase in those who continue moderate alcohol consumption. Substantial literatures have attempted to characterize health benefits/risks of moderate drinking lifestyles. Not uncommonly, reports address outcomes in a single outcome, such as cardiovascular function or cognitive decline, rather than providing a broader overview of systems. In this narrative review, retaining focus on neuro...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Mediterranean diet: The role of long-chain ω-3 fatty acids in fish; polyphenols in fruits, vegetables, cereals, coffee, tea, cacao and wine; probiotics and vitamins in prevention of stroke, age-related cognitive decline, and Alzheimer disease. Rev Neurol (Paris). 2019 Sep 11;: Authors: Román GC, Jackson RE, Gadhia R, Román AN, Reis J Abstract The mechanisms of action of the dietary components of the Mediterranean diet are reviewed in prevention of cardiovascular disease, stroke, age-associated cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. A companion article provides a comprehensive revi...
Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet and sugary beverages and health risks, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage, obesity or another hidden health issue. “The cause behind these associations isn’t clear,” said Bergquist. “Other potential biological causes could be attributed to experimental evidence linking consumption of artificial sweeteners to sugar cravings, appetite stimulation ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Soda Source Type: news
This study presents findings from a large sample with extensive clinical phenotyping—allowing us to examine the relationships of insulin resistance with a number of key psychopathological, cognitive, and functioning measures, using multivariate methods to assess the relative contributions of different factors to metabolic abnormalities. PwS often have many risk factors for metabolic abnormalities: lifestyle habits, medications, and underlying biological mechanisms including inflammation and oxidative stress. Treatment and prevention of metabolic abnormalities in PwS can be particularly challenging due to these multip...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
To drink or not to drink when it comes to your health really depends on a few important factors, including how much you imbibe and what health issues you’re concerned about. Alcohol in moderation can lower the risk of heart disease for some people, as well as reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and gallstones. But excessive drinking — more than about a drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men — is also linked to several types of cancer, including breast, colon, pharynx, larynx and esophageal. Too much alcohol can also take a toll on the liver. Some studies have also suggested that moderate drink...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alcohol Brain Dementia Source Type: news
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs
We present the case of an 80-year-old woman, single with no children, who lived alone, and, up until presentation, was able to perform activities of daily living self-sufficiently. She reported to have the support of friends and neighbors, and she lived in the small community of São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal. She had completed two years of college before dropping out during her third year, and her last job was as an elder care-worker. She had no personal or family psychiatric antecedents and no history of alcohol or illicit drug addictions. The patient was diagnosed with DM2 two years previously and was treate...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Report Current Issue acute confusional state delirium diabetes hyperglycemia psychosis Source Type: research
Hot on the heels of headlines linking alcohol consumption with longer life comes new research that casts a much more sobering light on drinking. According to an analysis of more than 1 million people—the largest study of its kind to date—scientists say that heavy alcohol use is the biggest modifiable risk factor for dementia, especially early-onset forms of the disease. The findings, which are published in The Lancet Public Health, came as a shock to the researchers involved. “We hypothesized that alcohol would play some role, but I don’t think anyone expected the size of the effect to be so large,&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news
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