Impaired albumin function: A novel potential indicator for liver function damage?

Impaired albumin function: A novel potential indicator for liver function damage? Ann Med. 2019 Nov 12;:1-28 Authors: Sun L, Yin H, Liu M, Xu G, Zhou X, Ge P, Yang H, Mao Y Abstract Albumin is the most abundant plasma protein and albumin infusion is commonly used. Conventionally, the biologic and therapeutic effects of albumin have been thought to be due to its oncotic properties. However, albumin has a variety of biologic functions, including molecular transport, anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, endothelial stabilization, anti-thrombotic effects, and the adjustment of capillary permeability. Despite this, the functions of albumin have not been thoroughly investigated. Recent studies have shown non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver failure to be associated with impairments in albumin function, which are associated with impairments in liver function and disease prognosis. Post-translational modifications of albumin cause structural modifications that affect protein function. Recently, the concentration of albumin associated with normal function, the "efficient albumin concentration", has been attracting more interest. In addition, although many biologic markers, including albumin concentration, are widely used for the assessment of early liver dysfunction in patients with liver diseases, the predictive values are unsatisfactory. However, clinical evidence has suggested that albumin function may represe...
Source: Annals of Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Ann Med Source Type: research

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Liver diseases, including liver cancer, cirrhosis, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH), impose a heavy disease burden worldwide [1,2]. Liver cancer and cirrhosis may derive from any chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV) infections, alcoholic liver disease, NAFLD, haemochromatosis, and autoimmune hepatitis [3]. Over the last four decades, the prevalence of overweight has increased over fourfold in children, and there has been a great relative increase in obesity prevalence with no signs of slowing [4].
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
ra Grieco The biological clock controls at the molecular level several aspects of mammalian physiology, by regulating daily oscillations of crucial biological processes such as nutrient metabolism in the liver. Disruption of the circadian clock circuitry has recently been identified as an independent risk factor for cancer and classified as a potential group 2A carcinogen to humans. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the prevailing histological type of primary liver cancer, one of the most important causes of cancer-related death worldwide. HCC onset and progression is related to B and C viral hepatitis, alcoholic an...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusions: The constantly increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population can contribute to a growing role of NAFLD/NASH in HCC epidemiology. Moreover, some particular challenges specific for patients with liver steatosis may impede proper HCC diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. PMID: 31631714 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medical Research and Opinion - Category: Research Tags: Curr Med Res Opin Source Type: research
idinis Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide due to late diagnosis and scarcity of treatment options. The major risk factor for liver cancer is cirrhosis with the underlying causes of cirrhosis being viral infection (hepatitis B or C), metabolic deregulation (Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the presence of obesity and diabetes), alcohol or cholestatic disorders. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with numerous effects, most of them compatible with the hallmarks of cancer (proliferation, migration, invasion, survival, evasion of apoptosis, deregulated metabolism, ...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Asymptomatic abnormal liver function tests (LFTs) are common, affecting 8% of the population. They are mainly caused by alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, whereas jaundice is most commonly caused by extrahepatic biliary obstruction, followed by alcoholic liver disease and acute liver injury from drugs or viruses. A careful history helps to exclude non-hepatic causes of abnormal LFTs, as well as indicating a potential hepatic cause. Cirrhosis can present with ascites or jaundice, the latter being common in alcoholic liver disease as a result of added injury from alcoholic hepatitis.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Assessment of liver disease Source Type: research
Authors: Carrier P, Debette-Gratien M, Jacques J, Loustaud-Ratti V Abstract The global population is aging, and so the number of older cirrhotic patients is increasing. Older patients are characterised by a risk of frailty and comorbidities, and age is a risk factor for mortality in cirrhotic patients. The incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as an aetiology of cirrhosis is increasing, while that of chronic viral hepatitis is decreasing. Also, cirrhosis is frequently idiopathic. The management of portal hypertension in older cirrhotic patients is similar to that in younger patients, despite the greater ri...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The SC-based interventions provide significant improvement in patients with CLD, however, there is a need of randomized, controlled studies with analysis of long-term follow-up. PMID: 31584360 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
Abstract The number of patients with chronic liver diseases is expected to decline due to progress in antivirus therapy, including direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C and nucleot(s)ide analogues for hepatitis B. On the other hand, the number of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) in the setting of metabolic syndrome has been increasing worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arises in the setting of chronic hepatic inflammation and liver cirrhosis associated with NAFLD/NASH. However, the detailed clinical features of NAFLD/NASH and NAFLD/NASH-derived HCC ...
Source: Yakugaku Zasshi : Journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Yakugaku Zasshi Source Type: research
Conclusion EUS-GBD is safe and efficacious in managing cholecystitis in patients with Child-Pugh A and B cirrhosis who are non-operative candidates. Further studies are needed to determine optimal patient selection and procedural technique. [...] © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  open access Full text
Source: Endoscopy International Open - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
The burden of chronic liver disease worldwide is substantial, with approximately 2 million deaths annually attributed to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma caused by viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), or alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), in addition to other important but less common chronic liver diseases.1 Despite widespread availability of accurate assays to diagnose viral hepatitis and effective therapies for hepatitis B and C, millions of individuals remain undiagnosed or have limited access to care worldwide.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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