Breast Cancer Screening via Digital Mammography, Synthetic Mammography, and Tomosynthesis

Publication date: Available online 13 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Ethan O. Cohen, Olena O. Weaver, Hilda H. Tso, Karen E. Gerlach, Jessica W.T. Leung
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Research syndication Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: To date there is no algorithm that has beyond doubt been proven to outperform double reporting by two certified breast radiologists. AI could, however, in the foreseeable future, take over the following tasks: preselection of abnormal examinations to substantially reduce workload of the radiologists by either excluding normal findings from human review or by replacing the double reader in screening. Furthermore, the establishment of radio-patho-genomic correlations and their translation into clinical practice is hardly conceivable without AI. PMID: 31811325 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Radiologe - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiologe Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — Mammograms are routinely used to screen for breast cancer in women, but there’s mounting evidence that they may also help identify women at risk for heart disease. Mammograms don’t just detect breast tumors, but can also show calcium deposits in the arteries in the breasts, which has been linked to calcium deposits in the arteries in the heart. Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries is strongly associated with heart disease. Researchers at the University of California San Diego looked at nearly 300 women and found that those with calcified breast arteries were more than twice as likely to...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Disease Heart Failure Mammograms Source Type: news
This study included 516 women who underwent CESM imaging for screening and diagnostic purposes between 2012 and 2015 in a single center. BPE at CESM images was retrospectively, independently and blindly graded by six experienced radiologists using the following scale: minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. Agreement between readers was estimated using Kendall's W coefficient of concordance. Associations between clinical factors and BPE, and between BPE and breast cancer were examined using generalized estimating equations. Association between BPE and breast cancer was assessed for the whole study group, and for the screening ...
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Mammograms can save lives, but in some cases, insurance companies are refusing to cover follow-up tests ordered by doctors.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Kristen Hoffman fought breast cancer a year ago. Now she's battling her insurance company to pay for her mammograms. Anna Werner explains.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Mammograms can save lives, but CBS News has learned in some cases, insurance companies are refusing to cover them – even for breast cancer survivors. We heard from hundreds of women who told us they could not afford the follow-up tests their doctors had ordered, like additional mammograms, ultrasounds and MRIs. Anna Werner reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 18 November 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Elaine F. Harkness, Susan M. Astley, D.Gareth EvansAbstractThe incidence of breast cancer continues to increase worldwide. Population-based screening is available in many countries but may not be the most efficient use of resources, thus interest in risk-based/stratified screening has grown significantly in recent years. An important part of risk-based screening is the incorporation of mammographic density (MD) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into risk prediction models to be comb...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
One in five women will experience depression over her lifetime, and one out of eight will develop breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of depression on adherence to mammography in Switzerland, where opportunistic and organized screening programs coexist. We analyzed data from 3206 women aged 50–69 who participated in the Swiss Health Survey 2012. We compared mammographic rates among women with no to mild versus moderate to severe depressive symptoms. The effect of the type of screening on the odds of undertaking a mammography was calculated using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Women with moderate to se...
Source: European Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: research
ConclusionsThese results suggest heterogeneity by grade for breast cancer etiology. Identification of potential risk factor differences among low-grade and high-grade DCIS and IDBC may help to clarify associations, and ultimately, improve breast cancer risk prediction models.
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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