3-dimensional ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy: total free versus partial fluoroscopy

ConclusionsOur findings show that fluoroscopy-free total ultrasound-guided PCNL represents an alternatively safe and efficient approach for the treatment of renal stones. Further study will be required to evaluate fluoroscopy-free TUPN in various clinical settings.
Source: World Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Related Links:

We present the case of a 46-year-old man who underwent successful antegrade ureteroscopy for lithiasis in his allograft ureter. At a scheduled follow-up 15  years after transplantation, computed tomography (CT) detected a 12-mm renal stone in the renal pelvis of the transplanted kidney. During his follow-up, gross hematuria was seen; the stone moved to the ureter, causing hydronephrosis. Ultrasound and non-contrast CT revealed hydronephrosis and a 15- mm stone in the transplanted ureter. Considering the stone size, location, and the difficulty of the access to the anastomosed ureteral orifice, percutaneous ureteroscop...
Source: Urolithiasis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Laparoscopic pyeloplasty and concomitant flexible renoscopy through lowermost trocar with basket extraction is a simple, attractive alternative for the simultaneous treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction presenting with coexisting nephrolithiasis. This method is useful and feasible, with minimal invasiveness and an early post-operative recovery.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The UProbe-2 ultrasound is safe and effective for puncture guidance during PCNL according to this initial study. It could provide a new and alternative choice for guidance of PCNL. However, more clinical trials especially randomized controlled trials should be performed. PMID: 29911509 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Surgical Innovation - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Innov Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Point-of-care ultrasound has modest diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing nephrolithiasis. The finding of moderate or severe hydronephrosis is highly specific for the presence of any stone, and the presence of any hydronephrosis is suggestive of a larger (>5mm) stone in those presenting with renal colic. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29427476 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Accident and Emergency Nursing - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Acad Emerg Med Source Type: research
ConclusionPoint‐of‐care ultrasound has modest diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing nephrolithiasis. The finding of moderate or severe hydronephrosis is highly specific for the presence of any stone, and the presence of any hydronephrosis is suggestive of a larger (>5mm) stone in those presenting with renal colic.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Academic Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Evidence ‐based Diagnostics Source Type: research
When do you get a CT scan? I've heard and seen everything from: always, first time they've had stone, systemically ill, hydronephrosis on bedside ultrasound. I've also seen people with mild hydro and suspected stone go home. The practice pattern varies wildly and I'm trying to gain a better understanding of what is important and what is not. What do you look for, what are your red flags, when do you scan?
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 21 December 2016 Source:Small Ruminant Research Author(s): P. Scott Modern portable ultrasound machines provide the veterinary clinician with an inexpensive and non-invasive method to further examine sheep on farm, which would take no more than 2–5minutes with results available immediately. Trans-abdominal ultrasonographic examination provides veterinarians with valuable information regarding bladder distension and uroperitoneum caused by obstructive urolithiasis, which greatly facilitates prompt corrective surgery. Advanced hydronephrosis, which affords a grave prognosis for uroli...
Source: Small Ruminant Research - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
“If you are given a second chance in life, don’t blow it,” you advise your eager resident. It has been an overwhelmingly busy day in the department. Interspersed between the motor vehicle collisions, hypoxic and hypotensive CHF exacerbations, and patients with florid sepsis, your team is trying to see and help all of the ankle pains, throat pains, and dysuria that have also walked through the waiting room doors. The neighborhood clinics are completely overbooked, and your department has been dealing with the overflow all week. Your resident has three charts in her hand and has just finished presenting the...
Source: EPMonthly.com - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Recently I had my follow up with the geneticist/Endocrinologist of last August's appointment. I absolutely adore her, because I have her personal email and every question I have is a promptly answered. Learning to live with MODY hasn't been all roses and sunshine, as I've developed a swelling of my left kidney (called hydronephrosis) which I've had an ultrasound and abdominal CT for and am scheduled for a renal perfusion scan in two weeks. It hasn't affected the overall function of said kidneys but it's there,like an albatross, needing attention. There are no kidney stones (#1 cause) and the geneticist feels like it's MODY...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Authors: Meola M, Samoni S, Petrucci I Abstract Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' m...
Source: Contributions to Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Contrib Nephrol Source Type: research
More News: Hydronephrosis | Kidney Stones | Study | Ultrasound | Urology & Nephrology