Hypertension accelerates cerebral tissue PO2 disruption in Alzheimer’s disease

This study measured stimulus-evoked brain tissue oxygenation changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD) and further explored the influence of exercise and angiotensin II-induced hypertension on these changes. In vivo two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy was used to investigate local changes in brain tissue oxygenation following whisker stimulation. During rest periods, PO2 values close to the arteriolar wall were lower in the AD groups and the PO2 spatial decay as a function of distance to arteriole was increased by hypertension. During stimulation, tissue PO2 response had a similar spatial dependence across groups. Tissue PO2 response in post-stimulation period was larger in AD groups (e.g., AD6 and ADH6) than in the controls (WT6 and WTH6). After a 3-month voluntary exercise period, some of these changes were reversed in AD mice. This provides novel insight into tissue oxygen delivery and the impact of blood pressure control and exercise on brain tissue oxygenation in AD.
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Birth control pills are among the most effective ways to prevent pregnancy, but only if women faithfully take them every day. Human nature being what it is, nearly half of women admit to missing a pill at least once every three months, and, as a result, about 9% of women on oral contraception become pregnant every year. That number would almost certainly fall if women only had to remember to take the pill once a month or so. That’s why researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (with support from the Gates Foundation) are trying to create a once-a-month birth control pill. In a paper published today (...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Birth Control embargoed study Reproductive Health Source Type: news
AbstractAging of the microcirculatory network plays a central role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of age-related diseases, from heart failure to Alzheimer ’s disease. In the eye, changes in the choroid and choroidal microcirculation (choriocapillaris) also occur with age, and these changes can play a critical role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In order to develop novel treatments for amelioration of choriocapillaris aging and prevention of AMD, it is essential to understand the cellular and functional changes that occur in the choroid and choriocapillaris during aging. In this re...
Source: AGE - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Conclusion: This systematic review highlights the need for population-based studies to provide necessary information for developing preventive and curative strategies specific to the Arab region. PMID: 31772681 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Behavioural Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Neurol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The optimal management of modifiable risk factors may be important for preventing dementia in subjects with diabetes mellitus. PMID: 31769236 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Diabetes and Metabolism Journal - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes Metab J Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionAs a model animal, rats not only provide a convenient resource for studying human diseases but also provide the possibility for exploring the molecular mechanism of exercise intervention in diseases. This review also aims to provide exercise intervention frameworks and optimal exercise dose recommendations for further human exercise intervention research.Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Jie Ding, Kendra L Davis-Plourde, Sanaz Sedaghat, Phillip J Tully, Wanmei Wang, Caroline Phillips, Matthew P Pase, Jayandra J Himali, B Gwen Windham, Michael Griswold, Rebecca Gottesman, Thomas H Mosley, Lon White, Vilmundur Guðnason, Stéphanie Debette, Alexa S Beiser, Sudha Seshadri, M Arfan Ikram, Osorio Meirelles, Christophe TzourioSummaryBackgroundDementia is a major health concern for which prevention and treatment strategies remain elusive. Lowering high blood pressure with specific antihypertensive medications (AHMs) ...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
One major reason Americans don’t get enough exercise is they feel they don’t have enough time. It can be difficult to squeeze in the 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise per week that federal guidelines recommend; only about half of Americans do, according to the most recent numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But new research suggests people may be able to get life-lengthening benefits by running for far less time. In a new analysis of 14 studies, researchers tracked deaths among more than 232,000 people from the U.S., Denmark, the U.K. and China over at least five years, and compar...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news
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Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
In this study, we hypothesized that moderately and chronically reducing ACh could attenuate the deleterious effects of aging on NMJs and skeletal muscles. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed NMJs and muscle fibers from heterozygous transgenic mice with reduced expression of the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT), VKDHet mice, which present with approximately 30% less synaptic ACh compared to control mice. Because ACh is constitutively decreased in VKDHet, we first analyzed developing NMJs and muscle fibers. We found no obvious morphological or molecular differences between NMJs and muscle fibers of VKDHet and contro...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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