In vitro models for investigation of the host-parasite interface - possible applications in acute Chagas Disease.

In vitro models for investigation of the host-parasite interface - possible applications in acute Chagas Disease. Acta Trop. 2019 Nov 07;:105262 Authors: Breyner NM, Hetch M, Nitz N, Rose E, de Carvalho JL Abstract Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main parasitic disease in the Western Hemisphere, with an increasing number of cases, especially in non-endemic regions. The disease is characterized by cardiomegaly and mega viscera, nevertheless, the clinical outcome is hard to predict, underscoring the need for further research into the pathophysiology of CD. Even though most basic and translational research involving CD is performed using in vivo models, in vitro models arise as an ethical, rapidly evolving, and physiologically relevant alternative for CD research. In the present review, we discuss the most past and recent in vitro cardiac and intestinal models available to study the host-parasite interface in CD, critically analyzing the possibilities and limitations of state-of-the-art alternatives for the CD host-parasite investigation. PMID: 31706861 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Chagas disease affected mostly women, with the indeterminate chronic form of the disease.
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: These data contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of T. cruzi infection in the Northeastern region of Brazil. Preventive measures based on vector control should be implemented in the study ar ea in order to reduce the burden this neglected tropical disease.
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, which is endemic to subtropical and tropical Americas. The disease treatment remains partially ineffective, involving therapies directed to the parasite...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Mepraia gajardoi and Mepraia spinolai are endemic triatomine vector species of Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite that causes Chagas disease. These vectors inhabit arid, semiarid and Mediterranean areas of Chile. Mepr...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
ppi A Abstract The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America but present worldwide. Research efforts have focused on the examination of immune mechanisms that mediate host protection as well as immunopathology during this parasitic infection. The study of CD8+ T cell immunity emerges as a key aspect given the critical importance of parasite-specific CD8+ T cells for host resistance throughout the infection. In recent years, new research has shed light on novel pathways that modulate the induction, maintenance, and regulation of CD8+ T cell respon...
Source: Trends in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Trends Parasitol Source Type: research
Authors: Kim YH, Yang Z, Lee J, Ahn HJ, Chong CK, Maricondi W, Dias RF, Nam HW Abstract Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and is endemic in many Latin American countries. Diagnosis is based on serologic testing and the WHO recommends two or more serological tests for confirmation. Acidic ribosomal P protein of T. cruzi showed strong reactivity against positive sera of patients, and we cloned the protein after fragmenting it to enhance its antigenicity and solubility. Twelve positive sera of Chagas disease patients were reacted with the fragmented ribosomal P protein using western...
Source: Korean Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Tags: Korean J Parasitol Source Type: research
by Higo Fernando Santos Souza, Sandra Carla Rocha, Fl ávia Silva Damasceno, Ludmila Nakamura Rapado, Elisabeth Mieko Furusho Pral, Claudio Romero Farias Marinho, Ariel Mariano Silber Chagas disease, caused byTrypanosoma cruzi, is a neglected tropical disease that affects 5 –6 million people in endemic areas of the Americas. Presently, chemotherapy relies on two compounds that were proposed as trypanocidal drugs four decades ago: nifurtimox and benznidazole. Both drugs are able to eliminate parasitemia and to avoid seroconversion in infected people when used in the a cute phase; however, their use in the chron...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Chagas disease (CD), caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is considered a neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization. Congenital transmission of CD is an increasingly relevant public health problem. It progressively becomes the main transmission route over the others and can occur in both endemic and non-endemic countries. Though most congenitally infected newborns are asymptomatic at birth, they display higher frequencies of prematurity, low birth weight, and lower Apgar scores compared to uninfected ones, and some suffer from severe symptoms. If not diagnosed and treated, infected newborns...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ens L Abstract Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease endemic in Latin America, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is responsible for significant health impacts, especially in rural communities. The parasite is transmitted by insect vectors in the Triatominae subfamily and due to lack of vaccines and limited treatment options, vector control is the main way of controlling the disease. Knowing what vectors are feeding on directly enhances our understanding of the ecology and biology of the different vector species and can potentially aid in engaging communities in active disease control...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: PCR in peripheral blood has proven to be the most adequate strategy for the diagnosis of CCD, allowing an early and reliable diagnosis. PMID: 31394076 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
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