Vitamin D does not reduce kidney damage in type 2 diabetes

Neither vitamin D3 nor omega-3 fatty acid supplements cut CKD risk in people with type 2 diabetes over five years Related items fromOnMedica UK research reveals racial inequalities in diabetes care Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Sugar not saturated fat is the major issue for CVD WHO dietary fat guidance fails to consider crucial evidence
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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Prevalence set to soar by 40% among older people in eight major country markets, including the UK, forecast suggests Related items fromOnMedica Coronary heart disease remains UK ’s biggest killer Women less likely than men to achieve CHD targets Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised NICE says far more people should take statins Apply different obesity criteria to BME patients
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Authors: Mühleck F, Laufs U Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle modifications and drug treatment of cardiovascular risk factors are able to effectively prevent CAD. The basis of prevention is the assessment of the individual cardiovascular risk, e.g. by using a validated risk score. Documented evidence for prevention of CAD is available for the control of hypertension using angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and calcium antagonists, for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia using ...
Source: Herz - Category: Cardiology Tags: Herz Source Type: research
UK physical activity levels low and show large inequalities – which directly contributes to poor population health Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Put children ’s health, not private profits, at heart of policy Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Should we recognise obesity as a disease?
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Evaluating stress levels over time and intervening when high perceived stress persists might reduce hypertension risk Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients WHO dietary fat guidance fails to consider crucial evidence Plant-based diet linked to lower risk of heart failure
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
GPs concerned about risks of overdiagnosis and over-treatment – NHS interventions must be evidence based Related items fromOnMedica GPs defend practice on prescribing statins Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Doctors campaign against ‘too much medicine’ Fund specialist dementia training to improve care and save money
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
For decades, doctors have known that losing weight can significantly lower risk of heart disease and by extension, reduce the risk of dying from heart-related events such as stroke and heart attack. Studies have shown that both lifestyle changes including diet and exercise as well as medications and weight-loss surgery can improve heart disease risk factors such as obesity and diabetes, for example, but data supporting the benefits of any of these approaches in actually lowering rates of heart events such as heart attack and atrial fibrillation, or in reducing early deaths from heart disease, have been less robust. The dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diabetes Heart Disease Source Type: news
Abstract Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), the most common liver disease, is characterized by accumulation of fat (>5% of the liver tissue), in the absence of alcohol abuse or other chronic liver diseases. Its prevalence is increasing because of obesity, metabolic syndrome or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD can cause liver inflammation and progress to Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis or Hepatocellular Cancer (HCC). Nevertheless, Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in NAFLD/NASH patients. Current guidelines suggest the use of p...
Source: Current Vascular Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Vasc Pharmacol Source Type: research
People who had a health check were more likely to receive lifestyle advice and be prescribed statins Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease Diabetes will soon cost NHS £16.9bn Most supplements offer no real benefit, some might increase risks
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
By WILLIAM H. BESTERMANN JR., MD New Scientific Breakthroughs Can Provide a Longer Healthier Life Twenty-one years of follow-up comparing usual care with a protocol-driven team-based intervention in diabetes proved that healthy life in humans can be prolonged by 8 years. These results were achieved at a lower per patient per year cost. Aging researchers have been confident that we will soon be able to prolong healthy life. This landmark study shows this ambitious goal can be achieved now with lifestyle intervention and a few highly effective proven medications. These medications interfere with the core molecular biol...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients aging chronic disease Denmark Diabetes William Bestermann Source Type: blogs
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