HCV-Infected Donor Kidney Transplant as Standard Practice HCV-Infected Donor Kidney Transplant as Standard Practice

Should hepatitis C-infected kidneys be transplanted into uninfected recipients as standard practice? This editorial explores the issues.American Journal of Transplantation
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplantation Journal Article Source Type: news

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ConclusionOur study showed excellent efficacy with the safety profile of this drug combination in end-stage renal disease patients. However, larger prospective studies and multicenter randomized controlled trials are needed for further confirmation.
Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionOur study showed excellent efficacy with the safety profile of this drug combination in End Stage Renal Disease patients. However, larger prospective studies and multicenter randomized controlled trials are needed for further confirmation.
Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionTreatment of HCV among stage 2, 3a, and 3b patients was achieved safely with a sofosbuvir-based regimen. We recommend that stage-4 patients wait until starting hemodialysis or transplantation.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract The incidence of infectious complications, compared with the general population and the pre-transplant status of the recipient, increases substantially following kidney transplantation, causing significant morbidity and mortality. The potent immunosuppressive therapy given to prevent graft rejection in kidney transplant recipients results in an increased susceptibility to a wide range of opportunistic infections including bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Over the last five years, several advances have occurred that may have changed the burden of infectious complications in kidney transplant recipie...
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) should be screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and infected individuals should be treated with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, according to the updated 2018 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) clinical-practice guideline.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news
Abstract Description: The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2018 clinical practice guideline for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an extensive update of KDIGO's 2008 guideline on HCV infection in CKD. This update reflects the major advances since the introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in the management of HCV infection in the CKD population. Methods: The KDIGO work group tasked with developing the HCV and CKD guideline defined the scope of the guideline, gathered evidence, determined topics...
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
Conclusions: With HCV infection rates remaining elevated, it is important to have safe and efficacious treatment options. Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is a safe and efficacious guideline-recommended, 8-week treatment for HCV in several patient populations, with these populations likely growing in the near future given ongoing and future studies. PMID: 31537106 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Annals of Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Ann Pharmacother Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeHepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is common and can impact on patient and graft survival rates. The efficacy and safety of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat genotype-4 HCV-infected KTRs have not been fully established.MethodsA prospective, single-arm, single-center study was conducted at Mansoura Urology/Nephrology Center (Mansoura University, Egypt). 114 HCV RNA(+) genotype 4 KTRs were enrolled in this study after a hepatology consultation and consented to start treatment with interferon-free DAAs. A sofosbuvir-based regimen was given to 109 recipients that had ...
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
A new study, from the University of Pennsylvania, has found that there are three times as many transplant centers using hepatitis C-infected kidneys than there were five years ago.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More transplant centers are willing to use kidneys infected with hepatitis C. With advances in treatment for hepatitis C, a new study finds the organs are viable and won't make a recipient ill.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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