The impact of dyslipidemia and oxidative stress on vasoactive mediators in patients with renal dysfunction

AbstractHyperlipidemia and oxidative stress are indispensable features of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that favor the development of atherogenic plaques and cardiovascular disease (CVD). A number of vasoactive mediators including proprotein convertase subtilisin –kexin type 9 (PCSK9), endothelin-1, nitric oxide, and angiotensin II have fundamental roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic events; moreover, their levels are affected by dyslipidemia and oxidative stress due to renal dysfunction. Therefore, therapeutic measures aimed at correcting dysl ipidemia and alleviating oxidative stress could potentially protect against CVD in CKD patients. In this review, we discuss the relation between dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, and vasoactive mediators as well as the available treatment options against these disturbances in CKD patients.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

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