Injectable, flexible electrode could replace rigid nerve-stimulating implants

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) By electrically stimulating nerves, neuromodulation therapies can reduce epileptic seizures, soothe chronic pain, and treat depression and a host of other health conditions without the use of conventional drugs like opioids. Now, University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineers and their collaborators have made a significant advance that could dramatically reduce the cost of neuromodulation therapy, increase its reliability and make it much less invasive.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: Pascal's philosophy reflects his own inner life, which was deeply influenced by the organic affections he suffered. PMID: 32239123 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology - Category: General Medicine Tags: Rom J Morphol Embryol Source Type: research
e;dek J, Rokyta R Abstract Neurostimulation methods are used in the treatment of chronic pain, although mainly for pharmacology resistant pain. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neurostimulation method using low direct current (0.029-0.08 mA/cm2) applied to a cathode and anode, which directly stimulates the cranial surface. The applied current causes the most significant changes directly under the electrodes: the cathode reduces the excitability of cortical neurons, whereas the anode increases excitability. The effect of stimulation usually lasts a few hours up to a few days. We obse...
Source: Physiological Research - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Physiol Res Source Type: research
__________ Just a heads-up about a great event later this week in Dublin, Ireland, for those working on virtual and augmented reality and healthcare innovation. When: Thu Dec 5, 2019 8:00 am — Fri Dec 6, 2019 5:00 pm. Where: Davenport Hotel Featured sessions include: Day 1 – Thursday, December 5th, 2019 9:00am‑9:30am Introductions, Welcome and Setting The Stage Robert Fine, Executive Director, International Virtual Reality and Healthcare Association (IVRHA) 9:30am-10:30am Keynote Presentation:  Virtual Reality and Healthcare: The Past, The Present and The Future Dr. Walter Gree...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology augmented reality Dublin healthcare healthcare innovation virtual-reality Source Type: blogs
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed an injectable flexible electrode that can aid in neuromodulation therapy, potentially replacing more rigid electrodes that do not mesh well with soft tissues. The injectable material c...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiology Materials Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Pain Management Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs
Marijuana is more mainstream than it’s ever been. A growing number of states are legalizing it medicinally and recreationally; millions of people are vaping products that contain the compound THC (potentially to the detriment of their health); and non-psychoactive CBD is in everything from beauty products to seltzer water. This spring, Google searches for CBD exceeded searches for buzzy health topics like acupuncture, apple cider vinegar and meditation, according to a recent JAMA Network Open analysis. The problem: Even though many consumers turn to cannabis compounds, known as cannabinoids, to soothe issues like dep...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
AbstractBackgroundPeople with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often have multimorbidity and take multiple medicines. Yet few studies have examined medicine utilization for comorbidities comparing people with and without AD.ObjectiveThe aim was to investigate the patterns of medication use for comorbidities in people with and without AD.MethodsAn Australian population ‐based study was conducted using the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme 10% sample of pharmacy claims data.People with ADwere defined as those dispensed medicines for dementia (cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, or risperidone for behavioral and psychological sympto...
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis study provides an important stepping stone in the understanding of demographic and seizure factors, personality domains, abnormal illness behaviors, and psychiatric comorbidity in the South African population with PNES. The study also reported on a cutoff score of 12 on the BAI-PC predicting PNES with 80% sensitivity and 89% specificity in a private hospital sample.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study provides an important stepping stone in the understanding of demographic and seizure factors, personality domains, abnormal illness behaviors, and psychiatric comorbidity in the South African population with PNES. The study also reported on a cutoff score of 12 on the BAI-PC predicting PNES with 80% sensitivity and 89% specificity in a private hospital sample. PMID: 31382179 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
This study explored the acceptability and feasibility of an MBCT intervention for this group. The data suggests that this intervention could be potentially useful in improving the mental health of this population, and includes suggestions for making the intervention culturally relevant.
Source: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: NeuroImageAuthor(s): Matthew J. Boring, Zachary F. Jessen, Thomas A. Wozny, Michael J. Ward, Ashley C. Whiteman, R. Mark Richardson, Avniel Singh GhumanAbstractDeep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established and effective treatment for several movement disorders and is being developed to treat a host of neuropsychiatric disorders including epilepsy, chronic pain, obsessive compulsive disorder, and depression. However, the neural mechanisms through which DBS produces therapeutic benefits, and in some cases unwanted side effects, for each of these disorders are only partia...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Chronic Pain | Depression | Epilepsy | International Medicine & Public Health | Neurology | Pain | University of Wisconsin