Is Depression Associated with Unhealthy Behaviors among Middle-Aged and Older Women with Hypertension or Heart Disease?

This study aims to assess the association between comorbid depression and health-promoting behavior in middle-aged and older Australian women with hypertension or heart disease.
Source: Womens Health Issues - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research

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Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use risks Source Type: blogs
This study will report the results of a series of descriptive and survival analyses compare an exposure of COPD in people over 40 years old (N=22,942) to predict the outcomes of: heart failure, depression, anxiety, coronary artery disease, diabetes, anemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, underweight, and osteoporosis while controlling for EHR status of: smoking, age, sex, and rurality. Results will be computed in March 2019. By the date of the ERS Congress 2019, we will be able to report the results of the aforementioned analyses, which will demonstrate the utility of using large EMR datasets to illustrate comorbid ...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: General practice and primary care Source Type: research
Conclusions: The follow-up after discharge in specialized units of tobacco cessation is very low, yet the efficacy of the treatment per year was high.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Tobacco, smoking control and health educ. Source Type: research
Conclusions: Psychological evaluation and social support become mandatory because their prognosis depends on these issues.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pulmonary hypertension Source Type: research
This study aims to assess the association between comorbid depression and health-promoting behavior in middle-aged and older Australian women with hypertension or hea...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
One major reason Americans don’t get enough exercise is they feel they don’t have enough time. It can be difficult to squeeze in the 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise per week that federal guidelines recommend; only about half of Americans do, according to the most recent numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But new research suggests people may be able to get life-lengthening benefits by running for far less time. In a new analysis of 14 studies, researchers tracked deaths among more than 232,000 people from the U.S., Denmark, the U.K. and China over at least five years, and compar...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news
I keep hearing radio ads about high-tech cleaners for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, which are used to treat sleep apnea. Bacteria and mold can accumulate in different parts of the device. Just the touch of a button, say the ads, and all undesirable organisms lurking in the CPAP pump, tube, and mask will be zapped into oblivion. Your CPAP system will be sanitized and ready for use while you sleep. But can a CPAP system really lead to illness? And if so, do we need space-age technology to clean a CPAP machine? Wait: What is a CPAP system and why is one needed? A CPAP machine is one of the best treatmen...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Health Infectious diseases Sleep Source Type: blogs
Fitbit or Apple Watch for running? Garmin or Misfit for swimming? Sleep Cycle or Sleep as Android for sleep tracking? What about measuring heart rate, blood pressure, or tracking how to cut out stress from your life? Dozens of gadgets on the healthcare wearable market promise you a healthier lifestyle, but it’s easy to go astray in the jungle of digital health gadgets. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers. Guidance in the health wearable universe By now, I have tested and used more than a hundred devices and gadgets that measure health parameters or vital signs. Thus,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics activity fitness fitness trackers Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation meditation mental health Personalized medicine sleep sleep optimization sleep tracking stress technology wear Source Type: blogs
The conditions of human life began to improve with the Enlightenment of the 18th century, and we are better off now by many measures: food access, health, lifespan, and so on. But it hasn’t been an unbroken line of advancement. In the last three decades, U.S. death rates have risen steeply from suicide and compulsive consumption of alcohol and drugs, which Princeton University professors Anne Case and Angus Deaton famously termed “deaths of despair.” Exceeding these deaths of despair by tenfold are rising deaths from type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease—caused significantly by c...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction diabetes Mental Health/Psychology neuroscience Source Type: news
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