DR ELLIE CANNON: Can you inherit dementia - and will any foods help to stop it advancing?

When we think of dementia, we think of memory loss, but that's vastly oversimplifying it. Most people have heard of Alzheimer's, but there are other types of dementia too, says DR ELLIE..
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Foyet HS, Keugong Wado E, Ngatanko Abaissou HH, Assongalem EA, Eyong OK Abstract Ziziphus mucronata Willd, also known as "buffalo thorn," belongs to the family Rhamnaceae. Its bark and leaves are used in folk medicine for the treatment of various deficiencies related to nociception, inflammation, mood, and depression. Still, there is a lack of scientific data regarding its potential effect on learning and memory process. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Ziziphus mucronata (ZM) on learning and memory impairment in a scopolamine-induced model of dementi...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Neurodegenerative disorders are a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Onset is typically insidious and clinical symptoms of behavioral change, memory loss, or cognitive dysfunction may not be evident early in the disease process. Efforts have been made to discover biomarkers that allow for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, to initiate treatment that may slow the course of clinical deterioration. Neuronal dysfunction occurs earlier than clinical symptoms manifest. Thus, assessment of neuronal function using functional brain imaging has been examined as a potential biomarker. While most early ...
Source: Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Category: Radiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Are you worried about Alzheimer’s disease? Does one of your parents or siblings have the disease? If so, your risks are between two and four times that of the general public. What about people without a family history of the disease? Unfortunately, everyone is at risk for it. By age 85, half of you reading this article today will have developed Alzheimer’s disease, with or without a family history. Sounds pretty scary, doesn’t it? I’m writing today to give you some good news. A new study from the lab of Harvard researcher Yakeel Quiroz, PhD, has suggested a new target for drugs that might have the p...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Genes Health Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease and the main cause of dementia. Its major symptom is memory loss, which is a result of neuronal cell death, which is accompanied by neuroinflammation. Some studies indicate the overactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in this disease, being, thus, a potential target for pharmacological treatment. Here, we used a transgenic mouse model of AD that expresses a mutant amyloid-β precursor protein (T41 mice) to investigate the effects of dactolisib (alternative name: NVP-BEZ23...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of DiseaseAuthor(s): Ju Gao, Luwen Wang, Chao Gao, Hiroyuki Arakawa, George Perry, Xinglong WangAbstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly, characterized clinically by progressive decline in cognitive function and neuropathologically by the presence of senile plaques and neuronal loss in the brain. While current drugs for AD are always employed as symptomatic therapies with variable benefits, there is no treatment to delay its progression or halt neurodegeneration. TAR DNA-bi...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular Basis of Disease - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
A UCLA-led study has found that MRI scans can help doctors distinguish whether a person ’s memory loss is being caused by Alzheimer’s disease or by traumatic brain injury.The study, which also involved researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, is important because it could help prevent doctors from misdiagnosing Alzheimer ’s disease — a diagnosis that can be devastating for patients and their families, and can prevent them from receiving appropriate treatment. (A 2016 study by researchers affiliated with the University of Toronto found that up to 21 percent of older adults with dementia may...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Authors: Rao YL, Ganaraja B, Joy T, Pai MM, Ullal SD, Murlimanju BV Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which is commonly seen in older individuals. This is characterized by cognitive dysfunction, which leads to dementia. Pharmacological treatments for AD are mainly targeted on its symptoms like memory loss and cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology involved in AD is intra-neuronal accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein as neurofibrillary tangle and extra cellular beta amyloid plaque deposition, which is due to oxidative stress. Here we review the neuro-protective effects...
Source: Frontiers in Bioscience - Elite - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Front Biosci (Elite Ed) Source Type: research
To delay or prevent the onset of memory loss, talk to your doctor. It can really be that simple. Among the diseases that Americans fear most, Alzheimer ’s and dementia consistently rank at the top of the list. What people don’t always realize is that many causes of memory loss are treatable and preventable, and the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more.
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Neurology Primary Care Source Type: blogs
After spending 30 minutes hunting for your car in a parking lot, or getting lost on a familiar route, have you ever considered asking your doctor for a blood test or brain scan to find out if you have Alzheimer’s disease? A number of factors contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. By definition, this form of dementia involves the buildup of a protein in brain called beta-amyloid. Beta-amyloid forms plaques that disrupt communication between brain cells, and ultimately destroys them. For this reason, tests for Alzheimer’s disease focus on beta-amyloid. Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease are being develop...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Healthy Aging Memory Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
A clinical trial has found that an innovative electromagnetic therapy device significantly reduced memory loss in seven out of the eight participants.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
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