Cancers, Vol. 11, Pages 1778: A Role for the Biological Clock in Liver Cancer

Cancers, Vol. 11, Pages 1778: A Role for the Biological Clock in Liver Cancer Cancers doi: 10.3390/cancers11111778 Authors: Mazzoccoli Miele Marrone Mazza Vinciguerra Grieco The biological clock controls at the molecular level several aspects of mammalian physiology, by regulating daily oscillations of crucial biological processes such as nutrient metabolism in the liver. Disruption of the circadian clock circuitry has recently been identified as an independent risk factor for cancer and classified as a potential group 2A carcinogen to humans. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the prevailing histological type of primary liver cancer, one of the most important causes of cancer-related death worldwide. HCC onset and progression is related to B and C viral hepatitis, alcoholic and especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-related milieu of fibrosis, cirrhosis, and chronic inflammation. In this review, we recapitulate the state-of-the-art knowledge on the interplay between the biological clock and the oncogenic pathways and mechanisms involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. Finally, we propose how a deeper understanding of circadian clock circuitry–cancer pathways’ crosstalk is promising for developing new strategies for HCC prevention and management.
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

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Conclusions: The constantly increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population can contribute to a growing role of NAFLD/NASH in HCC epidemiology. Moreover, some particular challenges specific for patients with liver steatosis may impede proper HCC diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. PMID: 31631714 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medical Research and Opinion - Category: Research Tags: Curr Med Res Opin Source Type: research
idinis Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide due to late diagnosis and scarcity of treatment options. The major risk factor for liver cancer is cirrhosis with the underlying causes of cirrhosis being viral infection (hepatitis B or C), metabolic deregulation (Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the presence of obesity and diabetes), alcohol or cholestatic disorders. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with numerous effects, most of them compatible with the hallmarks of cancer (proliferation, migration, invasion, survival, evasion of apoptosis, deregulated metabolism, ...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusion Massive SI and immune cell paralysis associated with ACLF represent the extreme severity of CAID in response to an infectious or sterile challenge. The severe immune disturbance plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the distinctive features of ACLF: organ failure and bacterial infection susceptibility. Excessive SI in ACLF results from the massive activation and dysfunction of an innate immune system challenged by increased PAMPs and DAMPs. SI leads to cell and tissue immunopathology contributing to hepatic and extrahepatic organ failure. Concomitantly, the course of ACLF is associated with a disproportio...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ali Mahzari1, Songpei Li1, Xiu Zhou1,2, Dongli Li2, Sherouk Fouda1, Majid Alhomrani1, Wala Alzahrani1, Stephen R. Robinson1 and Ji-Ming Ye1,2* 1Lipid Biology and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China The present study investigated the effects of matrine on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet and the mechanism involved. The study was performed in C57B/6J mice fed a MCD diet for 6 weeks to induce NAS...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our integrative analyses uncover how HCV perturbs the hepatocyte cell circuits to drive chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. This proteogenomic atlas of HCV infection provides a model for the discovery of novel drivers for viral- and non-viral induced liver disease.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes up 75%-85% of all primary liver cancers and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Chronic liver disease is the most significant risk factor for HCC with 80%-90% of new cases occurring in the background of cirrhosis. Studies have shown that early diagnosis of HCC through surveillance programs improve prognosis and availability of curative therapies. All patients with cirrhosis and high-risk hepatitis B patients are at risk for HCC and should undergo surveillance. The recommended surveillance modality is abdominal ultrasound (US) given that i...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary hepatic malignancies. With the exception of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), other etiologies of chronic liver disease require progression to cirrhosis before HCC development. Case reports have described HCC in noncirrhotic patients with hepatitis C (HCV) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Goal: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of patients without cirrhosis and CHB who developed HCC among a large cohort of HCC patients and to identify independent variables that are associated with no cirrhosis among patients with HCC. Study: Fr...
Source: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: LIVER, PANCREAS & BILIARY TRACT: Original Articles Source Type: research
Authors: Desai A, Sandhu S, Lai JP, Sandhu DS Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer, which in turns accounts for the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite being the 6th most common cancer it is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths. HCC typically arises in the background of cirrhosis, however, about 20% of cases can develop in a non-cirrhotic liver. This particular subgroup of HCC generally presents at an advanced stage as surveillance is not performed in a non-cirrhotic liver. HCC in non-cirrhotic patients is clinically silent in its early stages ...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
This report reviews the hepatoprotective effects of curcumin with a focus on its mechanistic insights in various hepatotoxic protocols. PMID: 30529260 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Food and Chemical Toxicology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Chem Toxicol Source Type: research
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