M209 omalizumab for the treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) affects up to 15% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), representing a significant clinical challenge. It is especially a concern in the pediatric population given adverse effects of steroids in this population. Here we report on the use of omalizumab in the treatment of steroid-resistant ABPA in a pediatric patient with CF.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research

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Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA) is caused by a hypersensitivity reaction to Apergillus fumigatus. Presentation includes wheezing, expectoration of brownish mucus plugs, pulmonary opacities and/or central bronchiectasis on chest imaging. ABPA in patients without previously diagnosed asthma or cystic fibrosis is a rare occurrence. Here we present an adult female with ABPA and undiagnosed asthma.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Sehgal IS, Dhooria S, Behera D, Agarwal R Abstract Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a pulmonary disorder that results from immune responses mounted against antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus, resulting in non-specific respiratory symptoms and structural lung damage. Classically defined in individuals suffering from bronchial asthma and cystic fibrosis, ABPA has recently been described in other lung diseases including COPD, pulmonary tuberculosis, idiopathic bronchiectasis and others. Herein, we report the first case of ABPA complicating Swyer-James-Macleod's syndrome that was successfully t...
Source: European Annals of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Asthma and Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Journal of Asthma and Allergy Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Asthma and Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Journal of Asthma and Allergy Source Type: research
Allergy to thermotolerant filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergillus fumigatus, is closely associated with fixed airflow obstruction, bronchiectasis, and other radiologically defined abnormalities, such as mucus plugging.1 However, not all asthma patients who are immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitized to A fumigatus develop these complications. To identify markers of poor outcomes in fungal allergy with asthma (and cystic fibrosis), the term allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was coined.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Allergy to thermotolerant filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergillus fumigatus, is closely associated with fixed airflow obstruction, bronchiectasis, and other radiologically defined abnormalities, such as mucus plugging.1 However, not all asthma patients who are immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitized to A fumigatus develop these complications. To identify markers of poor outcomes in fungal allergy with asthma (and cystic fibrosis), the term allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was coined.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
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Source: Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
This article is an abridged version of the AWMF mould guideline “Medical clinical diagnostics of indoor mould exposure” presented in April 2016 by the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventive Medicine (Gesellschaft f ür Hygiene, Umweltmedizin und Präventivmedizin, GHUP), in collaboration with the above-mentioned scientific medical societies, German and Austrian societies, medical associations and experts. Indoor mould growth is a potential health risk, even if a quantitative and/or causal relationship between the occurrence of individual mould species and health problems has ye...
Source: Allergo Journal International - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous, filamentous and spore-bearing fungus which usually grows at 37 degrees Celsius. It can be an opportunistic pathogen and can induce an inflammatory response in the airways through the production of various toxic and allergenic exoproducts. As a consequence, the clinical presentation may take a number of forms: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), aspergillus bronchitis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and an aspergilloma. ABPA occurs almost exclusively in asthma or cystic fibrosis (CF) patients [1].
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Cystic Fibrosis: Frequently Asked Questions Source Type: research
Abstract Aspergillus fumigatus is the causative agent of allergic broncho‐pulmonary aspergillosis. Prompt and accurate diagnosis may be difficult to achieve with current clinical and laboratory scores, which do not include immune responses to recombinant A. fumigatus allergens. We measured specific immunoglobulin E and G4 directed to recombinant A. fumigatus allergens in 55 cystic fibrosis patients without allergic broncho‐pulmonary aspergillosis but sensitized to A. fumigatus and in nine patients with allergic broncho‐pulmonary aspergillosis (two with cystic fibrosis and seven with asthma). IgG4 responses to recombi...
Source: Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
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