M307 anaphylaxis in an infant to cow's milk and an extensively hydrolyzed formula

Cow's Milk allergy (CMA) is the most common cause of food allergy in young children. Although a common problem in the pediatric population, some cases of CMA can be challenging in the setting of IgE mediated reactions and the risk of morbidity and mortality high.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research

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Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of individuals in the United States, and is increasing in prevalence.1-4 Although there is accumulating data on immunotherapy for peanut allergy,5-8 the cornerstone of management remains strict avoidance of peanut protein, maintenance of an emergency action plan and prompt use of epinephrine to treat systemic reactions in case of an accidental exposure, which occurs in up to 12-15% of peanut-allergic individuals annually.9,10 Peanut allergy significantly impacts quality of life,11 as it is typically lifelong, is the leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in children, and the leading cause of ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Food allergy is common, with a reported prevalence in adults of up to 10%. Unintended exposures in food-allergic individuals can cause anaphylaxis. When individuals experience frequent episodes of anaphylaxis with unclear food triggers, it is imperative to evaluate for alternative causes. Comprehensive evaluation seeks objective evidence of anaphylaxis, and consideration of a broad differential diagnosis, including rare etiologies such as systemic mastocytosis.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
The patient is an 18-year-old male with genetically confirmed ichthyosis (KRT10 gene mutation), who presented with atopic findings at age 12 and subsequently developed severe persistent asthma, eosinophilic esophagitis, and multiple anaphylactic food allergies.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
We present a patient without known food allergy, who acquired peanut sensitization after bilateral lung transplantation from his organ donor.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Recent epidemiological studies suggest that non-IgE-mediated childhood food allergic disorders such as eosinophilic esophagitis (EOE), celiac disease and allergic gastroenteritis (AG), may be increasing in parallel with previously observed increases in childhood IgE-mediated food allergy (FA) and food-induced anaphylaxis (FIA)1-4. The term AG encompasses food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES), eosinophilic enteritis and colitis, food protein induced enteropathy, food hypersensitivity enteritis and colitis, but not EOE.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the clinical manifestations and risk factors for anaphylaxis in PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from a nationwide cross-sectional study that previously reported on PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. Data from 273 patients with PFAS were collected, including demographics, list of culprit fruits and vegetables, and clinical manifestations of food allergy. We analyzed 27 anaphylaxis patients and compared them with patients with PFAS with oropharyngeal symptoms only (n=130). RESULTS: The most common cause of anaphylaxis in PFAS wa...
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research
Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with increased risk of food allergy (FA), this association is not fully understood, and the predictors of severe reactions to foods are not clear. In a review of 18 population-controlled studies, the rate of food sensitization was up to 6 times higher in patients with AD vs healthy controls.1 A recent study identified a potential physiologic mechanism by demonstrating increased skin barrier dysfunction, measured by increased transepidermal water loss and reduced skin filaggrin levels, in patients with AD and FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with increased risk of food allergy (FA), this association is not fully understood and the predictors of severe FA are not clear. In a review of 18 population-controlled studies, the rate of food sensitization was up to 6 times higher in patients with AD versus normal controls.1 A recent study identified a potential physiologic mechanism by demonstrating increased skin barrier dysfunction, measured by increased transepidermal water loss and reduced skin filaggrin levels, in patients with AD and FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Alpha-gal allergy is associated with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to galactose- α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), a carbohydrate found in beef, pork, and lamb. First described in the adult population in 2009 by Commins et al., this syndrome is associated with delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, and urticaria with symptom onset 3 to 6 hours after eating red meat.1,2,3 Bites from ticks, namely the Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) in the United States, are associated with production of IgE antibodies to alpha-gal, resulting in an immune system primed to react to foods containing the antigen in patients who previously ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Abstract Over the past few decades, an increase in the prevalence of asthma and food allergy has been observed in the pediatric population. In infants, food sensitization, particularly to egg, has increased the risk of developing allergic asthma. This is even more likely if sensitization to food allergens occurs early within the first few years of life. It is indeed known that both diseases may be present simultaneously in the pediatric population, but coexistence may negatively influence the severity of both conditions by increasing the risk of life-threatening asthmatic episodes as well as food-related anaphylax...
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
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