Dying to Die – The Janet Adkins Story

In 1990, Dr. Jack Kevorkian was just beginning his work in the death with dignity movement. Janet Adkins, who made a choice to die after being diagnosed with early Alzheimer’s disease, was his first assisted suicide patient. This week, Susan Clevenger publishes Dying to Die – The Janet Adkins Story. (Amazon) Clevenger interviewed and recorded stories from Janet’s family and closest friends, transcribed TV videos and read countless magazine and news stories. Her source material included Janet’s personal journals and letters from family and friends that the family had saved over the years.
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

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Older individuals who are informed by health care professionals that they have elevated levels of the protein amyloid —a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease—do not appear to experience adverse short-term psychological responses compared with those who learn their amyloid levels are normal, according to areport inJAMA Neurology.“We found that trial participants who did not have cognitive impairment and received an elevated amyloid result were no more likely than those receiving a not elevated amyloid result to experience depression, anxiety, or catastrophic reactions in the short term,” w...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease amyloid anxiety depression JAMA Neurology suicidality Source Type: research
Time for a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring this month 13 research findings, resources and brain teasers for lifelong brain and mental health. #1. “We found that people who exhibited higher repetitive negative thinking patterns experienced more cognitive decline over a four-year period. They also had specific declines in memory (which is an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease), and had more amyloid and tau deposits in their brain … There’s increasing evidence that chronic stress is both harmful to your body – and your brain. But more research is needed to underst...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Alzheimer’s Disease biofeedback brain health Brain Teasers DSM FDA mental health neurotech­nolo­gy noninvasive neurotechnologies noninvasive ne Source Type: blogs
Some of the professionals that work most with helping people with schizophrenia are nurses. There are so many types with different skill sets. Host Rachel Star Withers and Co-host Gabe Howards learn who these often overlooked healthcare workers are. Dr. Tari Dilks, Professor and President of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, joins with insight on what goes into being a psychiatric nurse.  Highlights in “The Role Nurses Play in Schizophrenia Treatment” Episode [01:14] Doctor sidekicks? [04:00] The types of nurses [06:40] Nurse Practitioners [11:00] Nurses specialties [13:00] Psychiatric Nursin...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Mental Disorder Mental Illness Nurses Nursing Psychiatric Nurse Psychotherapy Treatment For Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
It is increasingly recognized that there is significant heterogeneity in phenotype and clinical trajectories in Alzheimer's disease as well as Lewy Body and Vascular dementia. Relatively common neurodegenerative disorder, Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) presents with psychiatric features. Mood disorders are common and often precede core symptoms of LBD. Patient with LBD especially early in the course of disease are at increased risk for suicide. Psychosis is one of the most debilitating symptoms of LBD as it is an independent risk factor for nursing home placements, increased caregiver distress and mortality.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Session 304 Source Type: research
A brief look at the most recent death statistics from the CDC tells us that 74% of the deaths in the US are due to 10 causes: heart disease, cancer, injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke and cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, kidney disease, and suicide.1 So it comes as no surprise that many of us, as health care providers, are often consumed with treating disease, rescuing a patient from the jaws of death, and improving the quality of life for those who are afflicted by multiple comorbidities.
Source: Heart and Lung - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
It is increasingly recognized that there is significant heterogeneity in phenotype and clinical trajectories in Alzheimer's disease as well as Lewy Body and Vascular dementia. Relatively common neurodegenerative disorder, Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) presents with psychiatric features. Mood disorders are common and often precede core symptoms of LBD. Patient with LBD especially early in the course of disease are at increased risk for suicide. Psychosis is one of the most debilitating symptoms of LBD as it is an independent risk factor for nursing home placements, increased caregiver distress and mortality.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY- PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS IN THE COURSE OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS Source Type: research
Should people with Alzheimer's be covered by California's assisted suicide law? One experience suggests no.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I was on KPCC (NPR) in Los Angeles, yesterday, to address the question "Should Patients Diagnosed With Alzheimer’s Or Dementia Be Able To Choose Assisted Suicide?" A recent op-ed in the L.A. Times titled, “My friend has dementia and wants to end her life. California’s assisted-suicide law excludes her,” shines a light on the complexities of expanding the state’s law beyond patients with a cancer diagnosis or terminal illness. The law, passed in 2015 and modeled after a 1997 Oregon statute, allows physicians to give lethal drugs to mentally competent adults when they’re faced wi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, taller body height at the entry to adulthood, supposed to be a marker of early-life environment, is associated with lower risk of dementia diagnosis later in life. The association persisted when adjusted for educational level and intelligence test scores in young adulthood, suggesting that height is not just acting as an indicator of cognitive reserve. A Comparison of Biological Age Measurement Approaches https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/a-comparison-of-biological-age-measurement-approaches/ Researchers here assess the performance of a range of approaches to measuring biological...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion of the Evolutionary Genetics of Aging Thymic Involution Contributes to Immunosenescence and Inflammaging The Potential for Exosome Therapies to Treat Sarcopenia Correlations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Epigenetic Age Measures Evidence for PASK Deficiency to Reduce the Impact of Aging in Mice The Aging Retina, a Mirror of the Aging Brain Evidence for Loss of Capillary Density to be Important in Heart Disease Aspects of Immune System Aging Proceed More Rapidly in Men Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation Transplantation of Senescent Cells is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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