Variable clinical presentation by the main capsular groups causing invasive meningococcal disease in England

Neisseria meningitidis is a major global cause of meningitis and septicaemia worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Twelve meningococcal capsular groups have been identified, of which six (A, B, C, W, X and Y) are responsible for nearly all cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), globally. Different capsular groups predominate in different geographical regions and can fluctuate over time, as new strains are introduced into susceptible populations or following new vaccination programmes.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research

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Neisseria meningitidis (The meningococcus, Men) is a Gram-negative bacterium that cause meningitis and/or septicaemia. The virulence of Men is linked to many bacterial factors but the major one is the capsule. Based on the structure and the expression of the capsule, meningococcal strains are classified into 12 serogroups but Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) is linked almost only to six of them: A, B, C, W, Y or X causing sporadic cases, small clusters or epidemics all over the world. However, the distribution of meningococcal serogroups varies in time and from country to another (Acevedo et al., 2019).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Outbreaks of severe pneumococcal disease occur sporadically and can affect large numbers of individuals, although they are less frequent compared to the pre-antibiotic era.1 The responsible pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a Gram-positive bacterium that commonly colonises the nasopharyngeal tract, especially in young children. Occasionally, however, it can invade locally to cause mucosal infections including sinusitis, otitis media or pneumonia. Rarely, invasion of the bloodstream can lead to more serious infections, including septicaemia and meningitis.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Outbreaks of severe pneumococcal disease occur sporadically and can affect large numbers of individuals, although they are less frequent compared to the pre-antibiotic era.1 The responsible pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a Gram-positive bacterium that commonly colonises the nasopharyngeal tract, especially in young children. Occasionally, however, it can invade locally to cause mucosal infections including sinusitis, otitis media or pneumonia. Rarely, invasion of the bloodstream can lead to more serious infections, including septicaemia and meningitis.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Neisseria meningitidis is one of the more important pathogens of severe bacterial meningitis and septicaemia and can be classified into 12 different serogroups based on differences in the polysaccharide capsules. Serogroups A, B, C, W, X and Y cause almost all cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD).1,2 Vaccination using serogroup-specific polysaccharide or conjugate vaccines is the most effective means of prevention of IMD. Different serogroup distributions across different countries have led to different vaccination programmes and strategies.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Tim Mason (pictured), of Tunbridge Wells, Kent, died at just 21 years old in March last year from meningitis and septicaemia. His parents Fiona and Gavin Mason blame the IT blunder.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this study, markerless in-frame deletion mutants of the housekeeping sortase srtA and the two pilus-associated sortases, srtB and srtF, were generated and their importance in S. suis infections was investigated. We found that all three of these sortases are essential to disease in pigs, concluding that their cognate-sorted proteins may also be useful in protecting pigs against infection. PMID: 30543506 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Microbiology Source Type: research
yar T Abstract Anatipestifer disease is a contagious disease caused by Riemerella anatipestifer, affecting primarily ducks, geese and turkeys, and characterised by listlessness, diarrhoea, sneezing, nasal discharge, and nervous signs. Sporadically, it occurs in a wide range of other domesticated and wild birds as well. The incidence and characteristics of the disease seen in the three main host species are summarised based on birds submitted for routine laboratory investigation in Hungary over the period 2010-2014. The infection was diagnosed in a higher percentage in geese (9.9%) and ducks (7.5%). It occurred in ...
Source: Acta Veterinaria Hungarica - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Acta Vet Hung Source Type: research
The Royal College of Nursing is urging prospective student nurses to get vaccinated against meningitis and septicaemia before starting university, as the W strain continues to rise.
Source: Nursing Times - Category: Nursing Source Type: news
ConclusionSerotype data from this study helped in accurate estimation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine-23 protective coverage against serotypes causing IPD in India as 58.7% (95% CI: 53.8, 63.4) and 67.4% (95% CI: 62.7, 71.8) respectively. Penicillin non-susceptibility in meningeal IPD cases is 27.4%. Empirical therapy for meningeal IPD must be cephalosporin in combination with vancomycin since cefotaxime non-susceptibility in meningeal IPD is 9.9%
Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Serotype data from this study helped in accurate estimation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine-23 protective coverage against serotypes causing IPD in India as 58.7% (95% CI: 53.8, 63.4) and 67.4% (95% CI: 62.7, 71.8) respectively. Penicillin non-susceptibility in meningeal IPD cases is 27.4%. Empirical therapy for meningeal IPD must be cephalosporin in combination with vancomycin since cefotaxime non-susceptibility in meningeal IPD is 9.9. PMID: 29884448 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Immunol Infect Source Type: research
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