The Gluten-Free Diet: Use in Digestive Disease Management

AbstractPurpose of ReviewGluten is a commonly ingested polymeric protein found in wheat, barley, and rye that has gained recent notoriety because of its relationship to disease and health. Avoidance of gluten is appropriate in patients with a diagnosed gluten –related disorder and may have treatment implications in other diseases of the digestive tract. This review highlights current knowledge of gluten related disorders and the use of a gluten-free diet in gastrointestinal disease management.Recent FindingsGluten-free diets should be used in patients with a diagnosed gluten –related disorder including celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat-sensitive eosinophilic esophagitis. Use of this diet in management of other digestive conditions including gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease is controversial and not currently supported by the literature.SummaryThis review provides a framework for classifying gluten-related disorders in terms of pathogenesis, understanding the literature that supports dietary avoidance in modulation of gastrointestinal disease, and identifies limitations of dietary restriction in patients.
Source: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

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Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs
Authors: El-Salhy M, Gilja OH, Hatlebakk JG Abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) overlap. It is not clear whether GERD is caused by non‑erosive esophagitis, or erosive esophagitis. The Rome criteria are not widely used for the diagnosis of IBS in the clinic. In total, 1,489 IBS patients without red flags were included in the present retrospective study. They comprised of 1,331 females and 158 males with a mean age of 51 years. The diagnosis of IBS was verified by endoscopic and histopathological examinations. Whereas erosive esophagitis occurred in 97% of patient...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates colitis constipation gallstones Gliadin grain-free grains IBS Inflammation irritable bowel lectins obstipation wheat belly Wheat Germ Agglutinin Source Type: blogs
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to specific herbicides or pesticides. A farmer therefore can spray an herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. Or it may contain its own built-in pesticide such as Bt toxin, expressed by the plant because the gene for this pest-resistant compound has been spliced into the plant’s genetic code. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates dysbiosis Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Our ancestors who lived without grains, sugars, and soft drinks enjoy predictable bowel behavior. They ate some turtle, fish, clams, mushrooms, coconut, or mongongo nuts for breakfast, and out it all came that afternoon or evening—large, steamy, filled with undigested remains and prolific quantities of bacteria, no straining, laxatives, or stack of magazines required. If instead you are living a modern life and have pancakes with maple syrup for breakfast and you’ll be lucky to pass that out by tomorrow or the next day. Or perhaps you will be constipated, not passing out your pancakes and syrup for days, passin...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates bloating bowel flora bran constipation Dr. Davis fiber grain-free grains hydrate Inflammation laxatives Opiate drugs Opiods prebiotic undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Follow the current debate on “healthcare reform”–which has NOTHING to do with healthcare reform, but healthcare insurance reform, by the way–and you will hear comments about the escalating and uncontrolled cost of healthcare and how people need access to it. What you will NOT hear is that fact that, because the healthcare system fails to deliver genuine health, real health is actually quite easy, straightforward, and inexpensive–nearly free. We achieve a life of being Undoctored, not becoming a profit source for the healthcare industry, not being subjected to the predatory practices of Big P...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux anti-aging autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Dr. Davis energy Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health healthcare Inflammation joint pain low-carb Source Type: blogs
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux facial change gluten grains IBS Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Director chair, film slate and load horn. Here’s a proposal for you: If, by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle, a long list of conditions are reduced or reversed at no risk, almost no cost, reversing even chronic and potentially fatal conditions . . . does that mean that the notion of self-directed health might be on the horizon, i.e., putting control over health back in our own hands? I think it does. No, we will never implant our own defibrillators or take out our own gallbladders. But so many chronic health conditions afflicting modern humans recede that I believe that it is entirely reasonable to start talking a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle arthritis autoimmune diabetes eating disorder gluten grains Inflammation joint Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
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