Surgeons treat opioid addict by surgically implanting electrodes in his brain

West Virginia University neurosurgeons implanted electrodes into the brain of Gerod Buckhalter, 33, in the hopes that the first such surgical treatment in the US can regulate dopamine and addiction.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusion: Androgen receptor pathway targeting in advanced breast cancer remains a valid option with reasonable clinical benefit in non-selected patients. Future studies are needed to define an AR addicted cohort with better responses and outcome.
Source: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Abstract Addiction in patients with cancer is not well described. Patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) and cancer experience worse outcomes; however, no guidelines exist for identifying and successfully managing these issues in oncology. With the goal to improve patient safety and outcomes, an interprofessional work group at a major academic cancer hospital initiated a trial screening process for identifying substance abuse issues in an oncology population. Simultaneously, guidelines for patients with cancer and SUDs were created. PMID: 31730608 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Clin J Oncol Nurs Source Type: research
In conclusion, morphine administration during adolescence induced persistent changes in negative affect and brain toxicity selectively in male rats, suggesting female rats were resilient to these harmful effects. Given the widespread availability and use of opiate-based painkillers, the interplay between addiction, analgesia and emotional behaviors, and since adolescents and young adult humans are the age group with the highest abuse potential, these results add to the current literature by reporting distinct sex-specific opioid actions when administered in adolescence.
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Morbidity and mortality from opioid use disorder (OUD) remain at epidemic levels in the United States. In the 12-month period ending July 2018, approximately 46,000 people died from opioid overdose in the United States, approximately five deaths every hour.[1] The harms of OUD extend beyond the well-publicized overdose deaths. Aside from the tragic toll on families, patients experience social and medical sequelae of drug use. Among the medical sequelae is drug use-associated infective endocarditis, whose incidence has risen dramatically where opioid use disorder (OUD) is endemic; at least one state experienced a tenfold in...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
But You Can Drive With Marijuana or Cartons of Marlboros in Your Car To Your Heart's ContentJacob Sullum, a senior editor atReason, has revealed a striking set of provisions in thebill (H4183) passed by the Massachusetts House of Representatives on Wednesday. These provisions would allow the police to seize your vehicle if you possess any DIY or black market e-liquids in your car.The relevant provision in the bill reads as follows:" When the commissioner or a police officer discovers an untaxed electronic nicotine delivery system in the possession of a person who is not a licensed or commissioner-authorized electronic...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 14 November 2019Source: Cell, Volume 179, Issue 5Author(s): Avnish Kapoor, Wantong Yao, Haoqiang Ying, Sujun Hua, Alison Liewen, Qiuyun Wang, Yi Zhong, Chang-Jiun Wu, Anguraj Sadanandam, Baoli Hu, Qing Chang, Gerald C. Chu, Ramsey Al-Khalil, Shan Jiang, Hongai Xia, Eliot Fletcher-Sananikone, Carol Lim, Gillian I. Horwitz, Andrea Viale, Piergiorgio Pettazzoni
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Insomnia can be a disruptive condition that affects your entire life. When you aren’t able to sleep at night, it can negatively impact issues in almost every area of your life and well-being. If you are taking sleeping pills or are thinking about starting to take sleeping pills, make sure you know as much as possible about all the sleeping pill side effects. What Are Sleeping Pills and How Do They Work? Sleeping pills are used to treat insomnia. According to the National Sleep Foundation, insomnia is described as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. People with ins...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Sleep healthy sleep insomnia sleep aids sleep and chronobiology laboratory sleep deprivation sleep disorder treatment sleep disorders sleep duration sleep habits sleeping sleeping pills sleeplessness Source Type: blogs
What is the Definition of “Opioid”? The definition of opioid is as follows: Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, and many others. Opioids work by interacting with the opioid receptors on nerve cells in the body and brain. By interacting with these receptors, opioids medications are able to cut off communication between the pain point on the body to the brain. This chemical interaction gives it’s users pain relief that is too great for ov...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction to Pharmaceuticals fentanyl heroin heroin addiction opiate opiate abuse opiate addiction opiates opioid opioids Source Type: blogs
Sara Coombes, 43, from Ryde, Isle of Wight, denied her addiction for 25 years despite her 8am boozing and sneaking off from work to binge in secret. She was cured after seeing a self-help guru.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Say the word. Suicide. Say it aloud. Say it more than once. Say it until it sounds like any other word.  Our minds give words power, connotations, and destructive or healing qualities. Words, alone, can attack the body with symptoms of fear and uncertainty and, at the same time, be inexact and open to interpretation. What if you could rob a word like “suicide” of some of its isolating effect and control?  Words are serious business. What they represent – true or not – are real problems that need real solutions. Taking control of the power of words is one strategy that places the focus wher...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Communication Stigma Suicide crisis Power of words Semantics Source Type: blogs
More News: Addiction | Brain | Health | Neurology | Neurosurgery