Xiyanping injection therapy for children with mild hand foot and mouth disease: a randomized controlled trial.

Xiyanping injection therapy for children with mild hand foot and mouth disease: a randomized controlled trial. J Tradit Chin Med. 2017 Jun;37(3):397-403 Authors: Zhang G, Hou Y, Li Y, He L, Tang L, Yang T, Zou X, Zhu Q, Yan S, Huang B, Zhao J, Huang J Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical effects of Xiyanping injection intervention in pediatric patients with mild hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD). METHODS: A total of 329 patients were stratified and block-randomized for symptomatic treatment of HFMD and assigned to one of the following groups: Western Medicine (group A, n = 103), Xiyanping injection (group B, n = 109), or Xiyanping injection and symptomatic treatment using Western Medicine (group C, n = 117). During the trial, fever, rash, ulcers of the mouth were observed among participants in each group before and after treatment, and conversion rates from mild to severe HFMD were measured. RESULTS: After 3-7 days' treatment, no significant differences in the conversion rates from mild to severe HFMD were observed among the three groups (P> 0.05). There was a significantly low number of patients with the onset time of antifebrile effect, vanished time of hand and foot rashes and cumulative time for the ulcers in the mouth vanished, among the three groups (P
Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: J Tradit Chin Med Source Type: research

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