Sulfated oligosaccharide of Gracilaria lemaneiformis protect against food allergic response in mice by up-regulating immunosuppression

Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Carbohydrate PolymersAuthor(s): Qingmei Liu, Yafen Zhang, Zhendan Shu, Meng Liu, Runying Zeng, Yanbo Wang, Hong Liu, Minjie Cao, Wenjin Su, Guangming LiuAbstractSulfated oligosaccharide of Gracilaria lemaneiformis (GLSO) was prepared from sulfated polysaccharides which possessed antiallergic activity by degradation with high temperature and pressure combined with vitamin C treatment. The present study demonstrated that GLSO could attenuate food anaphylaxis, and inhibit the production of immunoglobulin E, histamine, and related cytokines in both prevention and therapy ovalbumin-induced mice model. Additionally, the gut microbiota analysis revealed that GLSO markedly rescued OVA-induced changes in the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. Following flow cytometry, GLSO was found to suppress the subpopulation of T helper 2 and B cells, and significantly up-regulate regulatory T cells (Tregs) differentiation. Furthermore, GLSO-mediated immunosuppression could be verified by co-culturing Tregs sorted from GLSO-treated mice and CD4+ T cells or mast cells. In a word, GLSO attenuated food anaphylaxis through the regulation of gut microbiota and induction of immunosuppression. GLSO had the potential to be used as a nutrient component against food allergy.Graphical Abstract
Source: Carbohydrate Polymers - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research

Related Links:

Abstract Shrimp allergy, a common form of food allergy is an adverse immunological response to shrimp proteins. BALB/c mice was sensitized by an adjuvant free oral administration of purified tropomyosin, from Metpenaeus dobsonii to characterize intestinal histological responses and immunological protein recognition pattern as it is unpractical in human subjects. Sensitized mice with higher dose of tropomyosin expressed symptoms of anaphylaxis including puffiness around eyes and snout, no activity, tremor and convulsion after challenge. The responses of high level of sera IgE, tropomyosin specific IgE and histamine...
Source: Immunology Letters - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Immunol Lett Source Type: research
Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of individuals in the United States, and is increasing in prevalence.1-4 Although there is accumulating data on immunotherapy for peanut allergy,5-8 the cornerstone of management remains strict avoidance of peanut protein, maintenance of an emergency action plan and prompt use of epinephrine to treat systemic reactions in case of an accidental exposure, which occurs in up to 12-15% of peanut-allergic individuals annually.9,10 Peanut allergy significantly impacts quality of life,11 as it is typically lifelong, is the leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in children, and the leading cause of ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionPresence of appropriate policies to manage food anaphylaxis events and anaphylaxis management training were missing in a substantial proportion of camps. Camp-tailored food allergy training is needed given the number of camps reporting food allergy reactions requiring epinephrine.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Food allergy prevalence has increased over the past 2  decades and is estimated to affect 8% of children and 4% to 10% of adults. There is an unmet need to evaluate new therapeutic modalities that may decrease the risk of food-induced anaphylaxis and improve patients’ quality of life. Oral, epicutaneous, and sublingual food immunotherapies have diff erent safety and efficacy profiles, and their long-term outcome and applicability are unclear. Food allergy trials are currently evaluating different biologics (given as monotherapy or adjunct to immunotherapy), modified food proteins, DNA vaccines, and fecal microbiota transplantation.
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 November 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Puja Sood Rajani, Hayley Martin, Marion Groetch, Kirsi M. JärvinenAbstractBreastfeeding is currently recommended as the optimal source of nutrition to infants. However, there are several studies that have shown clinical IgE and non-IgE-mediated reactions to foods in exclusively breastfeeding infants, specifically to cow’s milk, egg, peanut, and fish. Literature suggests that antigenic food proteins present in human milk can be found in substantial enough amounts to elicit clinical reac...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A review is also made of the disorder which, due to its variable clinical expression, is referred to as alpha-gal syndrome. The study concludes that a diagnosis of alpha-gal allergy should be considered in patients with urticaria-anaphylaxis of uncertain origin or manifesting after the administration of vaccines or products of bovine/porcine origin. PMID: 31718865 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Allergologia et Immunopathologia - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) Source Type: research
Oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy entails a risk of adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis. This safety concern is the major barrier for OIT to become a therapeutic option in clinical practice. The high heterogeneity in safety reporting of OIT studies prevents setting the safety profile accurately. An international consensus is needed to facilitate the analysis of large pooled clinical data with homogeneous safety reporting, that together with integrated omics, and patients/families ’ opinions, may help stratify the patients’ risk and needs, and help developing safe(r) individualized care pathways. Th...
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Cow's Milk allergy (CMA) is the most common cause of food allergy in young children. Although a common problem in the pediatric population, some cases of CMA can be challenging in the setting of IgE mediated reactions and the risk of morbidity and mortality high.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Food allergy is common, with a reported prevalence in adults of up to 10%. Unintended exposures in food-allergic individuals can cause anaphylaxis. When individuals experience frequent episodes of anaphylaxis with unclear food triggers, it is imperative to evaluate for alternative causes. Comprehensive evaluation seeks objective evidence of anaphylaxis, and consideration of a broad differential diagnosis, including rare etiologies such as systemic mastocytosis.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
The patient is an 18-year-old male with genetically confirmed ichthyosis (KRT10 gene mutation), who presented with atopic findings at age 12 and subsequently developed severe persistent asthma, eosinophilic esophagitis, and multiple anaphylactic food allergies.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Anaphylactic Shock | Biomedical Science | Carbohydrates | Food Allergy | Men | Nutrition | Study | Vitamin C | Vitamins