Food Addictions Are Real Addictions —And More And More People Are Getting Hooked

This article is excerpted from TIME: The Science of Addiction—What We Know. What We’re Learning. In some ways, of course, food is more insidious than drugs, because there’s no such thing as abstinence, no such thing as never starting in the first place, no such thing as being able to say, “Food? Never touch the stuff.” You eat because you’ll die if you don’t, so you spend your life in a sort of nutritional two-step—a little but not too much; go overboard today, cut back tomorrow; eat the good stuff but never the junk. Sometimes you succeed at all of that, and other times you fail terribly; we all do. The more we learn about how the brain and palate and metabolism process food, the more we’re realizing that a lot of this is not our fault. “In all my years as a physician, I have never ever met a person who chose to be an addict, nor have I ever met someone who chose to be obese,” said Nora Volkow, the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in her celebrated 2015 TedMed talk. “So, imagine what it must be like to be unable to stop doing something when you want to.” That inability is at the heart of addiction—and when it comes to food, we’re all at risk. Pleasure gets processed in many parts of the brain, but if you’re looking for the spot where good feelings can turn into bad outcomes, you’ll find it in the striatum. Buried deep in the midbrain, the striatum is rich ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Diet/Nutrition Obesity Source Type: news

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Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Book Reviews Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders Exercise General Habits Happiness Healthy Living Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Stigma Treatment Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Happiness joy Neurochemistry Neurotransmitter Pleasure Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III, the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle, Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Free Market health economics Libertarian Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first thi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Source Type: blogs
Authors: Bjerregaard P, Larsen CVL Abstract Greenland is a country in transition from a colonial past with subsistence hunting and fishing to an urban Nordic welfare state. Epidemiological transition from infectious to chronic diseases has been evident since the 1950s. Ninety percent of the population is Inuit. We studied three public health issues based on published literature, namely adverse childhood experiences, addictive behavior, and suicide; diet and obesity; and smoking. Alcohol consumption was high in the 1970s and 1980s with accompanying family and social disruption. This is still a cause of poor mental h...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
U.S. life expectancy has decreased for the second year in a row, and an editorial in the BMJ points to three contributing factors: drugs, alcohol and suicides, particularly among middle-age white Americans and those living in rural communities. The authors of the paper paint a bleak picture of the problems facing much of the United States today, but the authors say that policies that bolster the middle-class can help reverse the trend. The recent drop in life expectancy is alarming, the editorial states, “because life expectancy has risen for much of the past century in developed countries, including in the U.S.&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight All NNLM MAR funding opportunities are currently closed. In February, we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Now is the perfect time to start meeting with potential partners and consulting with NNLM MAR staff on health information outreach ideas. Contact us to set up a consultation. National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® begins on Monday! If your organization is getting involved with busting myths about drug use or addiction, tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
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Source: Acupuncture in Medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Acupunct Med Source Type: research
By KIP SULLIVAN Managed care advocates see quality problems everywhere and resource shortages nowhere. If the Leapfrog Group, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or some other managed care advocate were in charge of explaining why a high school football team lost to the New England Patriots, their explanation would be “poor quality.” If a man armed with a knife lost a fight to a man with a gun, ditto: “Poor quality.” And their solution would be more measurement of the “quality,” followed by punishment of the losers for getting low grades on the “quality” report card and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CMS Kip Sullivan value-based care Source Type: blogs
Former Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy tackled a range of public health crises such as Zika, drug and alcohol addiction and obesity. Now, he's shedding light on the rising number of lonely people in America and how it affects our health. Murthy joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss technology's role in what he calls an "epidemic," why the culture of masculinity may put more men at risk, and what we can do to combat loneliness in the workplace.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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