Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates from the Lower Respiratory tract in Western Sichuan, China: Antimicrobial susceptibility and Mechanism of beta-lactam Resistance and decade changes

Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): Xiao Lei Wang, Jiang Xie, Yuan Biao Guo, Bing Qing Zhu, Zhu Jun Shao, Hui Min Guo, Li Li Yang, Hua Wei Liu, Zhan Hao Wang, Jun Hu, Lu Fei HuangAbstactObjectivesTo monitor the serological typing of Haemophilus influenzae(Hi) in the lower respiratory tract infection in western Sichuan, China, the changes in beta-lactam resistance of the strains and the mechanism of beta-lactam resistance in these isolates over the past decade.Methods54 strains of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) isolated from 2003 to 2004 and 220 strains of NTHi isolated from 2013 to 2014 were selected randomly. Hi strains were characterized by serological typing, and by PCR analysis of the p6, fucK and cap gene. The MIC values for ampicillin (AMP), Amoxicillin-clavulanic (AMC) acid and cefuroxime (CXM) were determined by broth microdilution susceptibility test. The TEM-1, ROB-1 and ftsI genes of the strain were sequenced; We compared the data obtained over a decade. The mechanisms of beta-lactam resistance and the effect of amino acid substitution of the ftsI gene on the MIC values of AMP, AMC and CXM were analyzed, respectively.Results1. The MIC values of AMP, AMC and CXM of the NTHi strains isolated during 2013˜2014 were significantly higher than those of the strains collected during 2003˜2004 by rank sum test, p 
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Conclusions: This new computational system can give insights into the identification of new candidate therapeutic targets for pathogenic bacteria and discovery of new antimicrobial drugs through genome-scale metabolic network analysis and heterogeneous data integration, even for non-curated or incomplete networks.
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important factor for consideration in pandemic preparedness. Any reduction in treatability poses a potential risk to national and international security and economic stability when applied to pandemic-related pathogens (McArthur and Tsang, 2017). Increasing AMR among pathogens responsible for the development of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) (e.g., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) (Adam, 2002) is especially concerning given their propensity to cause bacterial infections secondary to viral influenza.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important factor for consideration in pandemic preparedness. Any reduction in treatability poses a potential risk to national and international security and economic stability when applied to pandemic-related pathogens (McArthur and Tsang, 2017). Increasing AMR among pathogens responsible for the development of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) (e.g. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) (Adam, 2002) is especially concerning given their propensity to cause bacterial infections secondary to viral influenza.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, we demonstrated that the selective boosting of lung innate immunity is a conceptually advantageous approach for improving the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment and fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Introduction Pneumonia constitutes a major cause of death, morbidity and health resource use worldwide. The main causative agents identified in adult patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are viruses (in 27–30% of cases, the most common being rhinovirus, influenza and coronavirus) and bacteria (14–23% of cases, with a marked predominance of Streptococcus pneumonia...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): Senda Mezghani Maalej, Sonia Ktari, Ratiba Ben Abdallah, Faouzia Mahjoubi, Adnene Hammami
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe potent activity of omadacycline against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria indicates that omadacycline merits further study in serious infections in which multidrug resistance and mixed Gram-positive and Gram-negative infections may be a concern.
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis study revealed that H. influenzae demonstrated multidrug low-susceptibility in recent years. The low-susceptible isolates had genetic diversity, meaning that resistance occurred independently.
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Mcl-1 upregulation prevents macrophage apoptosis-associated killing and establishes that apoptosis-associated killing is required to allow AM to clear ingested bacteria. Engagement of macrophage apoptosis should be investigated as a novel host-based antimicrobial strategy. PMID: 30649895 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
Conclusion Augmentin, ciprofloxacin and Peflacine have a sensitivity of 100%, while most of the organisms show resistance to Ampiclox, amoxicillin, and Septrin. [...] Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, BrazilArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  open access Full text
Source: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Since their introduction into healthcare and clinical practice in the early 20th century, antibiotics have revolutionized medicine. Alarmingly, these drugs are increasingly threatened by bacteria that have developed a broad diversity of resistance mechanisms. Antibiotic resistance can be transferred between bacteria, often on mobile genetic elements, acquired from the environment, or arise through mutation due to selective pressures of the drugs themselves. There are various strategies to resistance including active efflux of the drug from the bacterial cell, reduced permeability of the cell envelope, alt...
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
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