Study on concussions sounds the alarm for young female soccer players

A new study finds that while concussion rates in many sports are down, girls who play soccer are at nearly the same risk for traumatic brain injury as boys who play football. It's a trend so alarming, some top players are donating their brains to science. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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OBJECTIVE: We outline the development of a clinic that works directly with youth clients, their caregivers, and family members to help address symptoms that are persisting long after the youth sustained a concussion. Client referral characteristics are des...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Most head impacts in soccer occur from purposeful heading; however, the link between heading and neurological impairment is unknown. Previous work suggests concussion may result in an uncoupling between the autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular syste...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
New recommendations for the prevention, evaluation, and management of concussion in youth athletes are limited by the quantity and quality of evidence in the literature.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
Condition:   Concussion, Mild Intervention:   Device: Top Spin 360 Sponsors:   Western University, Canada;   TopSpin Technologies Ltd Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
BOSTON (AP) – New guidance on concussions shows there isn’t enough solid evidence to answer some of parents’ most burning questions about contact sports. That includes what age is safest to start playing them. Pediatric experts in sports medicine, neurology and related fields evaluated and rated three decades of sports concussion-related research. They say recent evidence filled in some blanks. Such as: — Teen girls face higher risks than boys for concussions when playing the same sport by the same rules — Hockey body checking bans reduce concussions in players under 13 — Limiting contac...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Youth Sports Source Type: news
New advice from pediatric experts says there isn't enough solid research to answer some of the most burning questions about kids, sports and concussions.
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: news
Background Concussion, a commonly reported injury among young athletes, can lead to short- and long-term physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep-related symptoms. Parents are in a unique position to help identify a possible concussion and to support a...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
PURPOSE To examine faculty and academic support staff members' awareness and knowledge regarding concussions. Design Cross-sectional, web-based questionnaire. Setting Division II collegiate setting. Subjects A total of 123 collegiat...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Introduction Concussion is regularly observed in rugby union and has generated a growing public health concern, yet remains one of the least understood injuries facing the sports medicine community. Evidence suggests that multiple concussions may increa...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
The objective of this cohort study was to compare institutionally derived normative data to manufacturer-provided normative values provided by ImPACT® Applications, Incorporated. METHOD: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division 1 university student athletes (n = 952; aged 19.2 ± 1.4 years, 42.5% female) from one university participated in this study by completing pre-injury baseline Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT) assessments. Participants were separated into 4 groups based on ImPACT's age and gender norms: males 19 years old (n =&...
Source: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Arch Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
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