Preventing childhood trauma could cut risks of 5 leading causes of death

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials found in a first-of-its-kind report that millions of cases of depression, heart disease and obesity could be prevented if childhood trauma was.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: Efforts that prevent adverse childhood experiences could also potentially prevent adult chronic conditions, depression, health risk behaviors, and negative socioeconomic outcomes. States can use comprehensive public health approaches derived from the best available evidence to prevent childhood adversity before it begins. By creating the conditions for healthy communities and focusing on primary prevention, it is possible to reduce risk for adverse childhood experiences while also mitigating consequences for those already affected by these experiences. PMID: 316...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
  That’s precisely what the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending: more weight loss surgery for overweight kids. This sort of perverted advice reflects the deep and widespread failure of the healthcare system to address nutrition and health, resorting instead to an awful surgical “solution” that, contrary to the AAP’s declaration that it is a proven safe option, is filled with complications, nutritional deficiencies, dysbiotic alterations in bowel flora, hormonal disruptions, and—not all that rarely—death. (Granted that it was over 10 years ago, but the first patient ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open bariatric surgery gastric bypass lap bad Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
By DEBORAH A. COHEN Physical inactivity is a mounting challenge for America. In reviewing the 2013-2015 American time use survey, we found that most Americans report spending their daily leisure time watching screens, and devote only a small fraction of leisure time—24 minutes for men and 14 minutes for women—to physical activity. A recent longitudinal examination of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that sitting time increased by an hour a day between 2007 and 2016, with the largest increases among adolescents ages 12-19 and adults, 20 years and older. As m...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients Amazon Deborah Cohen health and wellness hulu Netflix physical activity Rand Source Type: blogs
Fitbit or Apple Watch for running? Garmin or Misfit for swimming? Sleep Cycle or Sleep as Android for sleep tracking? What about measuring heart rate, blood pressure, or tracking how to cut out stress from your life? Dozens of gadgets on the healthcare wearable market promise you a healthier lifestyle, but it’s easy to go astray in the jungle of digital health gadgets. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers. Guidance in the health wearable universe By now, I have tested and used more than a hundred devices and gadgets that measure health parameters or vital signs. Thus,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics activity fitness fitness trackers Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation meditation mental health Personalized medicine sleep sleep optimization sleep tracking stress technology wear Source Type: blogs
The conditions of human life began to improve with the Enlightenment of the 18th century, and we are better off now by many measures: food access, health, lifespan, and so on. But it hasn’t been an unbroken line of advancement. In the last three decades, U.S. death rates have risen steeply from suicide and compulsive consumption of alcohol and drugs, which Princeton University professors Anne Case and Angus Deaton famously termed “deaths of despair.” Exceeding these deaths of despair by tenfold are rising deaths from type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease—caused significantly by c...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction diabetes Mental Health/Psychology neuroscience Source Type: news
Americans aren’t sleeping well. Roughly 80% of U.S. adults say they struggle to fall asleep at least one night a week, according to a recent Consumer Reports survey. And research has found that sleep problems are also on the rise among adolescents. While the causes of America’s sleep woes are up for debate, there’s little disagreement about America’s favorite remedy: Melatonin, by far the country’s most-used sleep aid. What is Melatonin? Melatonin is a hormone that plants and animals, including humans, produce naturally. The melatonin sold in over-the-counter pills is synthetic, but chemically...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized anti-oxidants drug safety inflammation medicine melatonin Source Type: news
When children are exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), it is well-established that they are at risk for developing adult chronic health conditions such as heart disease, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is emerging evidence that exposure to ACEs increases the risk of developing pediatric chronic conditions, including behavior problems, developmental delay, and obesity. One objective of this presentation will be to summarize my previously published work reporting the associations of ACEs exposure with obesity and the impact of family positive contextual factors on this relation...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: More than half of middle-aged women without cardiovascular symptoms present alterations in one or more exercise testing parameters. Alterations in the functional capacity or heart rate behavior, as verified by exercise testing, are associated with age, smoking, an overweight status and obesity.
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundFunctional limitations may be more common in middle-aged adults than previously recognized. However, there are few published data on the prevalence of activity limitations, and their association with multimorbidity, among adults 50 to 64  years old.ObjectiveTo describe the prevalence of activity limitations and the association with multimorbidity in middle-aged adults.DesignCross-sectional analysis of US population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011 –2016.ParticipantsThe total number of community-dwelling NHANES participants aged 50 –64 years old is ...
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
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