Three-Dimensional-Printed Model-Assisted Management of Craniovertebral Junction Abnormalities: An Institutional Experience with Literature Review.

Conclusions: Compared to computer-generated images, 3D-printed models are a more practical approach for dealing with complex CV junction abnormalities. They provide surgeons with deep insights into the complex bony anomalies as well as variations in the vertebral artery courses, thereby improving surgical outcomes. PMID: 31679320 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Asian Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Asian Spine J Source Type: research

Related Links:

By STEPHEN BORSTELMANN, MD Occasionally, you get handed a question you know little about, but it’s clear you need to know more.  Like most of us these days, I was chatting with my colleagues about the novel coronavirus. It goes by several names: SARS-CoV-2, 2019-nCoV or COVID-19 but I’ll just call it COVID.  Declared a pandemic on March 12, 2020 by the World Health Organization (WHO), COVID is diagnosed by laboratory test – PCR.  The early PCR test used in Wuhan was apparently low sensitivity (30-60%), lengthy to run (days), and in short supply.  As CT scanning was relatively availa...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Hospitals Medical Practice Physicians coronavirus CT scans Imaging infecton control Pandemic Radiology Stephen Borstelmann Source Type: blogs
A middle-aged woman with history of hypertension presented to another hospital approximately 2 hours after onset of chest pain and shortness of breath.This ECG was recorded on arrival:What do you think?This is technically a STEMI, with 1.5 mm STE in V1 and 1.5-2.0 mm in V2. The current criteria only require 1mm in V1 and 1.5mm in V2 for a female. However, I think many practitioners might not see this as a clear STEMI, and would instead call this " borderline. " The normal QRS complex with STE and large volume underneath the T-waves in V1-V3 confirm Occlusion MI (OMI). There is not technically STD in V6 and I, how...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
We presented the first case of successful management of complicated Stanford B-type aortic dissection combined with an ARSA with a new inclusion technique and stent graft (SG) implantation through an upper partial sternotomy. Patient concerns: A 39-year-old woman with a history of severe hypertension was admitted to our hospital because of sudden-onset chest and upper back pain. Diagnoses: Aortic computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated complicated Stanford B-type dissection with ARSA. Interventions: A new inclusion technique and SG implantation through an upper partial sternotomy were performed for the ...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Background and Objectives Accidental breach of the vertebral artery (VA) during the performance of cervical pain blocks can result in significant morbidity. Whereas anatomical variations have been described for the foraminal (V2) segment of the VA, those involving its V3 portion (between the C2 transverse process and dura) have not been investigated and may be of importance for procedures targeting the third occipital nerve or the lateral atlantoaxial joint. Methods Five hundred computed tomography angiograms of the neck performed in patients older than 50 years for the management of cerebrovascular accident or cervic...
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Discussion Oropharyngeal trauma is common and ranges from minor contusions to severe trauma of the head and neck. Sudden movement while having a foreign object in the mouth is a very common scenario with falls or collisions being common mechanisms. Common objects include toys, sticks, pens/pencils, chopsticks, toothbrushes, and popsicle sticks. Many of these injuries cause minimal problems such as a contusion to lips (i.e. “fat lip”). In general, the more anterior the location the more common the injury and the less likely to have a severe injury (i.e. lips). Whereas posterior structures are more protected, bu...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A 27‐year‐old woman complained of waist and back pain. Abdominal computed tomography angiography showed abdominal aortic dissection, the blood count revealed a high platelet count of 1655 × 109/L. Negative for JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL mutations (i.e. triple‐negative), the patient was diagnosed as essential thrombocythaemia (ET) with abdominal aortic dissection and was treated with cytoreduction and antiplatelet drugs. Cases of abdominal aortic dissection in ET have not been previously reported. As such, we proposed a mechanism of abdominal aortic dissection caused by endothelial dysfunction and...
Source: Internal Medicine Journal - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
Conclusion: ACS was occurred with a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition after EVAR, it reminds us the severe result of ACS and more methods to prevent it happened after surgical management.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
We report an experience with retrograde open mesenteric stenting for SIDSMA. A 45-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute onset of severe abdominal and back pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed a long occlusion of the SMA trunk. Initially, an endovascular solution was attempted, but this was unsuccessful as the guidewire failed to cross the lesion.
Source: Annals of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Discussion Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is caused by the compression of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) against the 3rd part of the duodenum creating a proximal intestinal obstruction. It is relatively rare and can be hard to distinguish from other causes of intestinal obstruction. Normally the SMA arises from the anterior aorta around the L1 vertebra. It extends anteriorly and caudally into the mesentery of the small bowel. The angle between the SMA and aorta is called the aortomesenteric angle and is usually 38-65°. The distance between the SMA and aorta is usually 10-20 mm. Within the aortomesent...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
More News: Angiography | Back Pain | Computers | CT Scan | India Health | Japan Health | Orthopaedics | Pain | Pain Management | Study