Q & A: A drug-free option for treating ADHD in children

Deciding how to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children can be a difficult decision for parents. Stimulants, such as Adderall and Ritalin, are the most commonly prescribed ADHD treatments — and are considered to be the most effective.   But in April, the FDA approved the first device-based, non-drug therapy to treat ADHD in children. The FDA decision followed the completion of aUCLA study demonstrating the effectiveness and safety of a trigeminal nerve stimulation device that could be a new option for treating the disorder.The device tested in the study was developed using technology invented at UCLA and licensed by NeuroSigma, a Los Angeles-based company focused on developing electronic medical devices. Called Monarch eTNS, it treats the symptoms of ADHD by sending gentle electrical pulses to the trigeminal nerve, which transports sensation from the face and head to the brain, and indirectly leads to stimulation of multiple brain regions.The device, which is about the size of a mobile phone, is loosely attached to the child ’s pajamas, and it has two wires that connect to an adhesive patch that is worn on the forehead during sleep.The study ’s co-principal investigators were Sandra Loo, a professor-in-residence of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and a member of the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior; and Dr. James McGough, co-director of the ADHD Clinic at theStewar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news