How Asthma Inhalers Are Choking the Planet

If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many of the 235 million people worldwide who suffer from asthma may be choking the planet on a powerful greenhouse gas they release in the process. The study, led by Dr. Alexander JK Wilkinson, a respiratory specialist with Britain’s National Health Service, focused on the 4.67 million people diagnosed with asthma in the United Kingdom, but it has implications for treatment worldwide, including in the U.S., where 22.6 million people (6.1 million of them children) are afflicted with the condition. The researcher compared the greenhouse gas emissions of aerosol pumps—known as metered dose inhalers (MDI)—with dry powder inhalers (DPI), which are shaped something like a hockey puck and are activated simply by inhaling. The two weren’t even close. The problem with MDIs is not carbon dioxide (the most common greenhouse gas), but rather methane...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news

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Abstract The authors have observed that the function linking health outcomes with exposure to particulate-matter (PM) follows a biphasic pattern. It peaks around levels of PM10≤100 μg/m3, then weakens and rises again at PM10 levels in the range of hundreds. This could be due to a different nature of PM, the first peak reflecting a stronger anthropogenic and the second - weaker non-anthropogenic particles' effect. The current analysis is focused at the biphasic pattern on the association between PM levels with BG and asthma exacerbations. Pollutants were assessed by local monitoring stations and a satelliteba...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
In this study, a superhydrophobic and superoleophilic melamine sponge loaded with cross-linked and swellable polydivinylbenzene was successfully fabricated by a facile and effective one-step impregnation-curing method with adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane. The prepared sponge not only exhibited high oil absorption capacity, but it also enabled rapid oil collection in situ, which could be extended to practical application. Moreover, the modified superhydrophobic sponge showed excellent mechanical resistance and chemical stability. The surface morphology and chemical composition were characterized by scanning electron micros...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
Conclusions: Similar to previous studies, our results suggest that patients suffering from CLBP differ with regard to the magnitude of mental burden and the presence of physical impairment. These differences ascertain the need for precise targeting of treatment for CLBP. Inpatient pain centers therefore should offer different multimodal therapy pathways and integrate a meaningful triage, taking into account the multifaceted nature of CLBP based on sophisticated knowledge about forms, differences, and relationships among the biopsychosocial components of CLBP. PMID: 31728134 [PubMed - in process]
Source: GMS German Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Ger Med Sci Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Hui-Mei Wu, Qiu-Meng Xie, Cui-Cui Zhao, Juan Xu, Xiao-Yun Fan, Guang-He FeiAbstractAimsBoth CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and melatonin have been reported to induce Th1 response and contribute to allergic asthma resistance. Here, we aimed to reveal how they confer such effect as well as whether they crosstalk with each other.Main methodsSix-week-old Female C57BL/6 mice were challenged by OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and were treated with CpG-ODN, CpG-ODN plus Luzindole or melatonin respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage flu...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
We examined US sensitivity for diagnosis of HCC in obese patients. Methods: Liver transplant patients data with HCC in explant was used (January 2012-December 2017). All patients underwent liver US within 3 months of diagnosis of HCC. Number/size of HCC lesions were extracted from radiologic and pathologic reports. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥30 kg/m2. Results: One hundred sixteen patients were included. 80% were male, with mean BMI of 31 kg/m2. The most common underlying liver disease was hepatitis C virus (62%). At the time of diagnosis, median number of HCC lesions was 2 (interquartile range [IQR], 1-3), and ...
Source: Clinical and molecular hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Clin Mol Hepatol Source Type: research
Alright, probably a horrible and simple question, but I want other opinions: We just took an OSCE, and I was given some interesting advice/directions. The pt had c/c of RUQ pain. Fair. Hx was no problem. Then, I got to the PE. Per our guidelines, I performed soft palpation, deep palpation, painful quadrant rebound tenderness, then for this at least, Murphy's sign. But, on soft palpation, barely touching the pt in RUQ, he flinched w/ pain. Then, I barely hooked my hand into his... Bear with me here – OCSEs
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medical Students - MD Source Type: forums
Is a stent always the answer for people with chest pain? Maybe not. But they do need to do some work, new research finds, including sticking to medication and changing behaviors. www.nbcnews.com Study Finds Limited Benefits of Stent Use for Millions With Heart Disease Stents and coronary artery bypass surgery are no more effective than intensive drug treatment and better health habits in preventing millions of Americans from heart attacks and death, a large study fou...
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Topics in Healthcare Source Type: forums
Should PainSpecialists strive to cultivate a humble and modest professional demeanor like pediatricians or family practice docs or should we be more “in your face” specialty like plastics, deem, or spine surgery? Imagine if no one Pain dressed up in fancy suits at conference ms and drove fast, expensive cars and instead just cane “as you are” in comfortable Dad jeans and JCPenny shirts and ties? Would purposely presenting ourselves this improve the specialty’s reputation and would... Cultivating a humble and modest professional demeanor
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news
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