Science: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism; Physicians Fight to Reassure, Immunize

Physicians repeat it over and over: Vaccines like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine do not cause autism; they are safe and effective. Yet the decades-old false claim that vaccines do cause autism has convinced millions of parents not to give their children potentially lifesaving shots and could lead more to opt out, according to Texas physicians.
Source: TMA News Room - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

CONCLUSIONS: The misleading vaccine autism controversy must be set aside in favor of examining actual neurological harms associated with vaccines, including building on existing research that has been ignored. Manufacturers of vaccines must be required to conduct placebo-controlled clinical studies for existing vaccines and for government approval of new vaccines. Many probable or confirmed neurological adverse events occur within a few days or weeks after immunization and could be detected if the trials were sufficiently large. Contrary to current opinion, large, long-term placebo-controlled trials of existing and new vac...
Source: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Int J Risk Saf Med Source Type: research
THURSDAY, April 23, 2020 -- Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) are highly effective and do not cause autism, say researchers who reviewed 138 studies that included 23 million children. " In terms of safety, we know from...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Existing evidence on the safety and effectiveness of MMR/MMRV vaccines support their use for mass immunisation. Campaigns aimed at global eradication should assess epidemiological and socioeconomic situations of the countries as well as the capacity to achieve high vaccination coverage. More evidence is needed to assess whether the protective effect of MMR/MMRV could wane with time since immunisation. PMID: 32309885 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Conclusion: This study provides preliminary insights into recurring sets of beliefs concerning the causes of ASD among the mothers of affected children. PMID: 32298221 [PubMed - in process]
Source: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being Source Type: research
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today finds MMR, MMRV and MMR+V vaccines are effective and that they are not associated with increased risk of autism. Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (also known as chickenpox) are infectious diseases caused by viruses. They are most common in children and young adults, and can lead to potentially fatal illnesses, disabilities and death. Measles remains one of the leading causes of childhood death around the globe. Rubella is also dangerous for pregnant women, as it can cause miscarriage or harm to unborn babies. The MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) is a combined...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
In a cohort of 657 461 children born in 1999 –2010, no association between the measles mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination and autism was observed. Despite this, it is unclear whether increasing medical evidence and facts about the lack of association between the MMR vaccination and autism will have beneficial impact in easing the minds of p arents and preventing unnecessary deaths. Prior to the availability of a measles vaccination in 1963, the majority of children contracted measles by the age of 15. Approximately 3–4 million US citizens were infected annually, with about 400–500 deaths, 48 000 hospital...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
(This post has been updated with relevant recent information.) The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the UK Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outb...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
PMID: 31476225 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
Recently, one of the students whom I was precepting at my primary care site stated “we didn't learn much about the measles.” To which I replied, “no, we haven't talked much about the measles.” Certainly, the students had memorized the standard immunization schedule and were aware of the thoroughly debunked theory linking the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism, b ut they needed a refresher on the presenting signs and symptoms of the extremely contagious viral infection and how to educate their patients and families.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
More News: Autism | Children | Health | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Mumps | Mumps Vaccine | Rubella | Rubella Vaccine | Science | Vaccines