Effects of Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients aiming to improve functionality of the plegic upper extremity. Currently, tDCS is not routinely used in post stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of bihemspheric tDCS combined with physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) on upper extremity motor function.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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After a stroke, the main goal is to get back home and be as independent as possible. To achieve that goal, most stroke rehabilitation centers focus on helping people to regain lost function, such as the inability to use a hand, to speak, to swallow, or to walk. A great deal of effort is put into functional recovery so that the patient can go home safely and adequately perform activities of daily living (ADLs). There is little effort put into aerobic exercise and conditioning in most stroke rehabilitation programs. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA)...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Neurology, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Gary A Ford, Bipin B Bhakta, Alastair Cozens, Suzanne Hartley, Ivana Holloway, David Meads, John Pearn, Sharon Ruddock, Catherine M Sackley, Eirini-Christina Saloniki, Gillian Santorelli, Marion F Walker, Amanda J FarrinSummaryBackgroundDopamine is a key modulator of striatal function and learning and might improve motor recovery after stroke. Previous small trials of dopamine agonists after stroke provide equivocal evidence of effectiveness on improving motor recovery. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of co-careldopa plus routi...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Acupuncture therapy seems effective for motor function, pain relief and activities of daily living in stroke patients with mild SHS, when it is used in combination with rehabilitation. The low certainty of evidence downgrades our confidence in making recommendations to clinical practice. Introduction Shoulder-hand syndrome (SHS) is a common condition among people who have had a stroke, with its reported prevalence ranging from 12% to 49% (1, 2). The main symptoms of SHS include pain, hyperalgesia, joint swelling and limitations in range of motion (ROM) (3). Post-stroke SHS is also named type I complex ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
(Brown University) Medicare-covered stroke patients receive vastly different amounts of physical and occupational therapy during hospital stays despite evidence that such care is strongly associated with positive health outcomes, a new study by Brown University researchers found.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Minnesota. Study Design This study was part of a previously published randomized controlled trial (NCT02250092) designed to detect differences in hand function as a result of the intervention (Gillick et al., 2018b) Participants were evaluated within 11 days prior to (Pre-test, average 5 days between Pre-test and intervention), within 5 days after (Post-test, average 2 days between intervention and Post-test), and 6-months after Follow-up average 173 (days between intervention and Follow-up) the intervention. After enrolling, participants were...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Abstract Background and Purpose Previous research suggests that patients receiving inpatient stroke rehabilitation are sedentary although there is little data to confirm this supposition within the Canadian healthcare system. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to observe two weeks of inpatient rehabilitation in a tertiary stroke center to determine patients' activity levels and sedentary time. Methods Heart rate (HR) and accelerometer data were measured using an Actiheart monitor for seven consecutive days, 24 h/day, on the second week and the last week of admission. Participants or their proxies c...
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research
Theories are an important part of scientific development. Theories are essentially a collection of propositions or hypotheses that build a picture of what is in order to predict or control or somehow explain what’s going on. The extent to which a theory’s predictions represent what actually happens, given a set of circumstances, allows us to place more or less faith in the adequacy (or perhaps accuracy) of that theory. The problem with social theory is that there are so many complex interactions between variables that it’s very hard to generate hypotheses that represent what actually goes on in the world ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics Research biopsychosocial disability healthcare pain management values Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing function in the patients with PSD was significantly improved using TDT combined with NMES. Stimulating electrodes placed at the suprahyoid region or on both suprahyoid and infrahyoid regions resulted in no difference of effect. However, NMES on suprahyoid region could further improve the moving distance of hyoid bone anteriorly. PMID: 29278871 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil Source Type: research
Although he’s only a little over a year old, Nolan Morel is a bona fide charmer. Clad in a red shirt and navy blue suspenders, he flashes a happy grin at his mother, Rosalia; his physician, Dr. Laura Lehman; and the others in the room. “Look at those dimples!” someone coos, and he giggles in response. “I can’t believe how social he’s being,” laughs Rosalia. “He wasn’t always like this.” In fact, Nolan’s first several days of life were anything but lighthearted. Just a few hours after his birth at a hospital north of Boston, he stopped breathing and had to be...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories child life Dr. Laura Lehman feeding therapy occupational therapy physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news
Twice a year, Osvaldo and Sol board a plane in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For a week or more, they leave behind their home, their friends, their jobs — and, sometimes, their two daughters, Ines and Clara. But what waits for them, a continent away, is worth it. In Boston, they say, they have found expert care for their son, Francisco. “Francisco was perfectly fine when he was born,” says Sol. “But two days later, we were having trouble waking him up.” Although initially doctors assured the family that his behavior was normal, they quickly transferred him to the neonatal intensive care unit when h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Michael Rivkin International Health Services physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news
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