Viruses, Vol. 11, Pages 1018: Simultaneous Immunization with Multivalent Norovirus VLPs Induces Better Protective Immune Responses to Norovirus Than Sequential Immunization

Viruses, Vol. 11, Pages 1018: Simultaneous Immunization with Multivalent Norovirus VLPs Induces Better Protective Immune Responses to Norovirus Than Sequential Immunization Viruses doi: 10.3390/v11111018 Authors: Maria Malm Timo Vesikari Vesna Blazevic Human noroviruses (NoVs) are a genetically diverse, constantly evolving group of viruses. Here, we studied the effect of NoV pre-existing immunity on the success of NoV vaccinations with genetically close and distant genotypes. A sequential immunization as an alternative approach to multivalent NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine was investigated. Mice were immunized with NoV GI.3, GII.4-1999, GII.17, and GII.4 Sydney as monovalent VLPs or as a single tetravalent mixture combined with rotavirus VP6-protein. Sequentially immunized mice were primed with a trivalent vaccine candidate (GI.3 + GII.4-1999 + VP6) and boosted, first with GII.17 and then with GII.4 Sydney VLPs. NoV serum antibodies were analyzed. Similar NoV genotype-specific immune responses were induced with the monovalent and multivalent mixture immunizations, and no immunological interference was observed. Multivalent immunization with simultaneous mix was found to be superior to sequential immunization, as sequential boost induced strong blocking antibody response against the distant genotype (GII.17), but not against GII.4 Sydney, closely related to GII.4-1999, contained in the priming vaccine. Genetically close antigens may interfere with the immu...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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Purpose of review Gastroenteritis results in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children in low-and-middle-income settings. Rotavirus and norovirus are the leading causes of viral gastroenteritis. Although introduction of rotavirus vaccines into childhood immunization programmes has reduced disease burden, vaccine effectiveness remains low in developing countries. Norovirus is replacing rotavirus as the most common cause of diarrhea hospitalization in settings where rotavirus vaccines are highly effective. Genetically determined host factors, such as expression of histo blood group antigen...
Source: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: GASTROINTESTINAL INFECTIONS: Edited by Gagandeep Kang and Eric R. Houpt Source Type: research
Abstract Rotaviruses cause severe diarrhea in infants and young children, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Despite implementation of current rotavirus vaccines, severe diarrhea caused by rotaviruses still claims ∼200,000 lives of children with great economic loss worldwide each year. Thus, new prevention strategies with high efficacy are highly demanded. Recently, we have developed a polyvalent protein nanoparticle derived from norovirus VP1, the S particle, and applied it to display rotavirus neutralizing antigen VP8* as a vaccine candidate (S-VP8*) against rotavirus, which showed promise as a ...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The diarrhea severity reduction in children provides evidence that the rotavirus vaccination program in the northwest of Mexico has been successful, even among children infected by the rotavirus emergent strain G12, however, norovirus resulted as the leading severe gastroenteritis-causing agent in children with rotavirus vaccine. PMID: 31063865 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
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Source: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
From the 13th International Symposium on dsRNA viruses in Belgium, Vincent speaks with Harry Greenberg about his career and his work on rotaviruses, noroviruses, hepatitis B virus, and influenza virus. <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: […]
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: This Week in Virology gastroenteritis Harry Greenberg hepatitis b virus norovirus rotavirus vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs
Publication date: August 2018Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association, Volume 117, Issue 8Author(s): Wan-Ju Yu, Shih-Yen Chen, Chi-Neu Tsai, Hsun-Ching Chao, Man-Shan Kong, Yi-Jung Chang, Cheng-Hsun ChiuBackground/PurposeRotavirus vaccines were launched in Taiwan since early 2006. Our study was aimed to figure out long-term extended molecular epidemiology in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in hospitalized young children after rotavirus vaccination in Taiwan.MethodsDuring the 10-year period from January 2007 to December 2016, fecal samples from children under 5 years old with AGE hospitalized in Chang Gung Children's...
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Krisztián Bányai, Mary K Estes, Vito Martella, Umesh D ParasharSummaryEnteric viruses, particularly rotaviruses and noroviruses, are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotaviruses primarily affect young children, accounting for almost 40% of hospital admissions for diarrhoea and 200 000 deaths worldwide, with the majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. Two vaccines against rotavirus were licensed in 2006 and have been implemented in 95 countries as of April, 2018. Data from eight high-income and middle-incom...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2018Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 29Author(s): Sasirekha Ramani, Sue E Crawford, Sarah E Blutt, Mary K EstesStudies of human infectious diseases have been limited by the paucity of functional models that mimic normal human physiology and pathophysiology. Recent advances in the development of multicellular, physiologically active organotypic cultures produced from embryonic and pluripotent stem cells, as well as from stem cells isolated from biopsies and surgical specimens are allowing unprecedented new studies and discoveries about host–microbe interactions. Here, we summarize re...
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Krisztián Bányai, Mary K Estes, Vito Martella, Umesh D ParasharSummaryEnteric viruses, particularly rotaviruses and noroviruses, are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotaviruses primarily affect young children, accounting for almost 40% of hospital admissions for diarrhoea and 200 000 deaths worldwide, with the majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. Two vaccines against rotavirus were licensed in 2006 and have been implemented in 95 countries as of April, 2018. Data from eight high-income and middle-incom...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2018Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 29Author(s): Sasirekha Ramani, Sue E Crawford, Sarah E Blutt, Mary K EstesStudies of human infectious diseases have been limited by the paucity of functional models that mimic normal human physiology and pathophysiology. Recent advances in the development of multicellular, physiologically active organotypic cultures produced from embryonic and pluripotent stem cells, as well as from stem cells isolated from biopsies and surgical specimens are allowing unprecedented new studies and discoveries about host–microbe interactions. Here, we summarize re...
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
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