Community Living for Hospice Patients: Don't " Put " People in Nursing Homes

by Lizzy Miles (@LizzyMiles_MSW)No one should ever be “put” in a nursing home. You might agree with this statement because you don’t like nursing homes, but that is not what I’m saying. The word “put” is offensive when you are describing a person, unless you are talking about putting a 3 year old in the time out corner because he colored on the walls.I would like to make the argument that no adult wants to be ‘put’ anywhere. You put dishes away, you do not put people away. When we are facing a situation in which the care needs exceed the family member’s ability, there are times where the best option is for the elder tomove to a safer environment.Let ’s look at these two scenarios:Daughter puts mom in a facility because mom is too much of a burden for daughter to take care of at home.OrMom moved to a new community in which there were nurses who could take care of her health care needs. There are chefs who make her meals and caretakers who help her with her activities of daily living. She has opportunities to make new friends, play bingo, listen to music, and arrange flowers. Daughter ’s time with mom can be spent sharing memories, watching movies and working on jigsaw puzzles together.Same scenario. Which one feels better to you?We do not want to say to our loved one, “You are too much for me.”What we want to say is, “I want you to have the best care possible and I believe this choice will be b...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: caregiver caregiving communication geriatrics miles nursing home reframing social work social worker Source Type: blogs

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Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Medicine Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs
by Bob Arnold (@rabob)I am not sure what led me to go from thinking about data and evidence in the literature to waxing philosophical recently. It may be that I saw Rufus Wainwright in concert and heard him sing “Hallelujah” with his sister, Lucy Roache Wainwright (Google it). It may be that one of our cardiology fellows died suddenly of unknown reasons and everyone at my hospital is a little fragile. Or that I was just on service and trying to balance the existential realities of sadness and dying with teaching learners and dealing with institutional budget cuts. But when I sat down today and tried to think of...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: arnold david foster wallace The profession Source Type: blogs
by Robert MacauleyI could write a book about that …But do I really want to? That ’s the question I asked myself a few years ago, when I was invited by Oxford University Press to submit a formal proposal for a comprehensive book on the ethics of palliative care. So I reached out to mentors for advice, and they all said the same thing: Enlist twenty of your friends to each write a chapter, and you can be the editor.Sage advice, which I didn ’t take. Partly because I like challenges. Partly because I don’t really like the unevenness of multi-author texts. And partly because I drastically underestimate...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: ethics macauley The profession writing Source Type: blogs
Cloning, CRISPR and gene editing, synthetic life forms, and longevity. The latest scientific discoveries are able to offset the natural order of human existence and meddle with sacred questions of life and death. Even so, does gaining insight into the secrets of being mean it should also be put into practice? Are we aware of the consequences? Where are the boundaries to augment life? Life, death and the coin for Charon the Ferryman In Japanese folklore, the Shinigami, gods or spirits of death came to the persons who were destined to die and invited them over the threshold of life and death. In ancient Egypt, Anubis, having...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Cyborgization artificial intelligence augmentation bioethical cloning CRISPR death future gene editing Health Healthcare life longevity research synthetic life Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs
By Lizzy MilesI had forgotten that I had written about my first few days as a hospice volunteer. I just discovered it while I was looking through some old electronic files. Now, ten years later, with more education and a career in hospice, I still notice that some things never change. You would think that I would be more certain about things, but I don't think I am. However, I believe that uncertainty is a necessary part of the job. I've written about howwe don't know death. When we are uncertain, that means we are evaluating our behavior and how it's perceived by others. I now believe it's good to be a little bit nervous ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: hospice lizzy miles social work uncertainty volunteer volunteering Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aetna CVS OptumCare United Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
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Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: book review gratitude karen Kaplan sachs Source Type: blogs
Earlier this year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) released a new policy statement, outlining its concerns that the use of clinical pathways in oncology may be posing significant barriers to providing high-quality, evidence-based cancer care. The Organization’s statement, which was published in the Journal of Oncology Practice, contained recommendations to ensure that clinical pathways in oncology promote - and not hinder - the care of patients with cancer. The statement also asserts that the way in which these treatment management tools have proliferated in oncology raises significant concerns ...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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