Physical Activity: The Secret —Not So Secret—to Prevent and Revert Metabolic Dysregulation in People of All Sizes

Physical activity and the influence on metabolic phenotypes is an important area of research as the obesity epidemic continues to rise and remains a potent public health crisis. Physical activity, which is a multifactorial behavior, is a modifiable risk factor for the development of obesity and premature mortality.1 Ample literature reports the importance of physical activity for health promotion and chronic disease prevention.2 In this issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Martinez-Gomez et  al3 highlight the need to focus on how individuals transition from differing states of metabolic health, or lack thereof, and the association with physical activity.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

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ConclusionRVHR in class-II and class-III obese patients is safe, feasible, and effective. In addition to this, it has comparable short-term outcomes with those non-obese and class-I obese patients.
Source: Hernia - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
This study aimed to estimate MetS status and its associations with geography, economic development, birth weight, and parental education of Chinese children and adolescents. METHODS: Data were derived from 15,045 participants aged 7-18 years across seven Chinese provinces. Physical measurement and blood tests were conducted to assess the five classical MetS components described by the International Diabetes Federation, including abdominal obesity (the essential component), high blood pressure, low high-density cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglyceride, and elevated fasting glucose (FG). Logistic regression was adopted to ...
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 December 2019Source: Prostaglandins &Other Lipid MediatorsAuthor(s): Rodolfo Quintana Castro, Isaac Aguirre Maldonado, Ida Soto Rodríguez, Rosa A. Deschamps Lago, Peter Grube Pagola, Yolanda K. Urbina de Larrea, Victoria E. Juárez Rivera, Luis E. Ramos Manuel, Alfonso Alexander AguileraAbstractObesity is considered a global epidemic and is mainly associated with the development of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver (NAFLD). The pathogenesis between obesity and hepatic steatosis is partially known, but could involve differentiated or tissue...
Source: Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators - Category: Lipidology Source Type: research
There is a constant and consistent message in the medical and lay press that obesity is a modern epidemic affecting the developed world. It causes and exacerbates multiple diseases including cardio-metabolic, musculoskeletal, cancer and respiratory diseases [1]. There is no doubt that improving diet and lifestyle to eliminate obesity has positive health benefits [1]. Although this truism is well-known and accepted, the impact of obesity on the immunobiology of disease [1–4] is only beginning to be unravelled and this might reveal more subtle, albeit profound, effects of obesity on chronic inflammatory diseases.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles. We are currently facing an “obesity epidemic” worldwide. Promoting inefficient metabolism in muscle represents a potential treatment for obesity and its complications. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps in muscle are responsible for maintaining low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration through the ATP-depe ndent pumping of Ca2+ from the cytosol into the SR lumen. SERCA activity has the potential to be a critical regulator of body mass and adiposity given that it is estimated to contribute upwards of 20% of daily energy expenditure....
Source: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism - Category: Physiology Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity and being overweight have become a worldwide epidemic affecting more than 1.9 billion adults and 340 million children. Efforts to curb this global health burden by developing effective long-term non-surgical weight loss interventions continue to fail due to weight regain after weight loss. Weight cycling, often referred to as Yoyo dieting, is driven by physiological counter-regulatory mechanisms that aim at preserving energy, i.e. decreased energy expenditure, increased energy intake, and impaired brain-periphery communication. Models based on genetically determined set points explained some of the weight control m...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Authors: Chawla R, Jaggi S Abstract The intricate relationship between obesity and T2DM is well recognised, as evidenced by the coining of the term 'diabesity' by Dr Ethan Sims that encompasses the two.Most patients with type 2 diabetes are obese and the global rise in obesity largely explains the epidemic rise in incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes(T2DM) over the last few decades. Obesity has been linked to insulin resistance and predisposes to metabolic abnormalities including prediabetes, type diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.Weight reduction is an essential component to prevent progression from predi...
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
To fix this conundrum,'the most effective strategy may be to recognize that obesity is a disease and needs to be treated as such, and to hold providers accountable for care,'says one public health expert.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news
DISCUSSION: We expect that the FADK Project will contribute significantly to our understanding of FA. PMID: 31796135 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Neuropsychiatrica - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Acta Neuropsychiatr Source Type: research
[Daily Maverick] In the shadow of HIV many things are hidden. Do a quick Google search ('in the shadow of HIV') and a torrent of disease and social ills will blast across your browser. You'll find gender-based violence and stigma, sugar-daddies, obesity and hypertension, patriarchy, cancer and diabetes, denial, guilt, and the opioid crisis. Also hiding, deep in the shadows, are adolescent boys and young men.
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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