Measles Makes Your Immune System Forget How to Fight Other Diseases

Not so long ago, coming down with measles was seen almost as a rite of passage. Before measles vaccination began in the U.S. in the early 1960s, millions of Americans, many of them children, contracted the virus each year—forcing them to weather a flu-like illness and telltale skin rash, but also bestowing lifelong immunity. As a result, some Americans still view measles as relatively harmless—which, in addition to a dangerous uprising of anti-vaccine sentiment, has led some parents to decline shots for their children, contributing to a resurgence of preventable illness in the U.S. and overseas. A pair of related studies published in Science and Science Immunology, however, busts the myth that measles isn’t dangerous. In addition to being a serious disease in its own right, measles can also virtually wipe out a person’s immune system, leaving them with “immune amnesia” that makes them more susceptible to other diseases, according to the research. Doctors have long known that measles predisposes sufferers to other illnesses. Measles can lead to serious complications like neurological damage, but many of the approximately 110,000 global measles-related deaths each year actually come from concurrent infections like pneumonia. The new studies are among the first to demonstrate why that happens. “Every time we see a pathogen, our immune system recognizes this pathogen, builds immunity to it and then stores it in the form of immune memory,...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Infectious Disease Research Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 14 November 2019Source: The Lancet Global HealthAuthor(s): Karoun H Bagamian, John D Anderson, Farzana Muhib, Oliver Cumming, Lindsey A Laytner, Thomas F Wierzba, Richard RheingansSummaryBackgroundDiarrhoea, a global cause of child mortality and morbidity, is linked to adverse consequences including childhood stunting and death from other diseases. Few studies explore how diarrhoeal mortality varies subnationally, especially by cause, which is important for targeting investments. Even fewer examine indirect effects of diarrhoeal morbidity on child mortality. We estimated the subnational d...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
This article considers explanations for the challenge in recruiting schools for surveys ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
ConclusionsA policy of selective histopathology after cholecystectomy is oncologically safe and reduces costs.
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Authors: van Veen M, Peters A, Mulder N, van Meijel B, Koekkoek B Abstract In the Netherlands, long-term community psychiatric treatment for patients with a severe mental illness (SMI) is poorly developed and lacks a structured, goal-centered approach. Often this form of treatment is provided by community mental health nurses (CMHN's).Especially in the group of nonpsychotic patients with SMI, it often leads to care-as-usual with limited proven interventions and an unstructured treatment. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT) was developed to provide this group of patients a focus, a theoretical view,...
Source: Issues in Mental Health Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Issues Ment Health Nurs Source Type: research
Authors: Maniero VC, Rangel PSC, Coelho LMC, Silva CSB, Aguiar RS, Lamas CC, Cardozo SV Abstract A progressive increase in the circulation of arboviruses in tropical countries has been observed, accounting for 700,000 yearly deaths in the world. The main objective of this article was to identify the presence of Zika (ZIKV), dengue (DENV), and Chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses in immature stages of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Household collections of immature phases of the vectors were carried out in the years 2015 and 2016. A total of 2902 dwellings were visited and the rate of infestation with larvae and pupae of ...
Source: Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research - Category: Research Tags: Braz J Med Biol Res Source Type: research
Abstract Analysis of the Amino-peptidase N (APN) protein from Anopheles culicifacies as a vector based Transmission Blocking Vaccines (TBV) target has been considered for malaria vaccine development. Short peptides as potential epitopes for B cells and cytotoxic T cells and/or helper T cells were identified using prediction models provided by NetCTL and IEDB servers. Antigenicity determination, allergenicity, immunogenicity, epitope conservancy analysis, atomic interaction with HLA allele specific structure models and population coverage were investigated in this study. The analysis of the target protein helped to...
Source: Bioinformation - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Bioinformation Source Type: research
ConclusionsCarbapenem-based regimen of combination therapy, seems to be an option to treat patients infected withKlebsiella pneumoniae resistant to ceftazidime/avibactam and susceptible to carbapenem, at least when the risk of mortality is low.
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Tobacco use in the U.S. is changing, according to new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of American adults who smoke fell to a new low in 2018, while e-cigarette use continued to climb. About a fifth of American adults used some type of tobacco product in 2018, according to the data. Cigarettes were the most popular, used by 13.7% of adults. That’s a small decrease from 14% the year before, and another record low for the U.S., which has seen a two-thirds decline in smoking since 1965. Meanwhile, e-cigarette use rose from 2.8% of U.S. adults in 2017 to 3.2% in 2018. Use of...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study public health Source Type: news
Butterfly Network, the digital health unicorn democratizing medical imaging, is continuing to add new applications for its handheld, single probe, smartphone-connected ultrasound technology. The Butterfly iQ, the multi-purpose pocket-sized ultrasound...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Exclusive News Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs
Condition:   Ovarian Cancer Intervention:   Drug: W_ova1 Vaccine Sponsors:   University Medical Center Groningen;   Biontech RNA Pharmaceuticals GmbH Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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