New Insights Into Cryptococcus Spp. Biology and Cryptococcal Meningitis

AbstractPurpose of ReviewDefective cell –mediated immunity is a major risk factor for cryptococcosis, a fatal disease if untreated. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM), the main presentation of disseminated disease, occurs through hematogenous spread to the brain from primary pulmonary foci, facilitated by yeast virulence factors. We revisit r emarkable recent improvements in the prevention, diagnosis and management of CM.Recent FindingsCryptococcal antigen (CrAg), main capsular polysaccharide ofCryptococcus spp. is detectable in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of infected patients with point of care lateral flow assays. Recent World Health Organization guidelines recommend 7-day amphotericin B plus flucytosine, then 7-day high dose (1200  mg/day) fluconazole for induction treatment of HIV-associated CM. Management of raised intracranial pressure, a consequence of CM, should rely mainly on daily therapeutic lumbar punctures until normalisation. In HIV-associated CM, following introduction of antifungal therapy, (re)initiation of ant iretroviral therapy should be delayed by 4–6 weeks to prevent immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, common in CM.SummaryCM is a fatal disease whose diagnosis has recently been simplified. Treatment should always include antifungal combination therapy and management of raised intracranial pressure. Screening for immune deficiency should be mandatory in all patients with cryptococcosis.
Source: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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ConclusionsCryptococcosis develops in various organs. Typical radiological manifestation accompanied with positive serum CrAg provides helpful clues for the diagnosis. Lumbar puncture is a critical diagnostic method to distinguish CM. The accumulated dose of GC is associated with cryptococcosis in patients with CTD.Key Points•Pulmonary cryptococcosis is suspected if pulmonary nodules adjacent to the pleura are present, with serum CrAg positive.•Cryptococcal meningitis has insidious onset and the diagnosis mainly depends on lumber puncture.•Cryptococcal sepsis is not rare and needs timely blood culture in suspected patients.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Abstract Cryptococcosis has become an important infection in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Although Cryptococcus is mainly recognized by its ability to cause meningoencephalitis, it can infect almost any organ of the human body, with pulmonary infection being the second most common disease manifestation. In cases of meningitis, symptom onset may be insidious, but headaches, fevers, or mental status changes should warrant diagnostic testing. Symptoms of pulmonary disease are nonspecific and may include fever, chills, cough, malaise, night sweats, dyspnea, weight loss, and hemoptysis. Due to prot...
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Semin Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2020; 41: 069-079 DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400280Cryptococcosis has become an important infection in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Although Cryptococcus is mainly recognized by its ability to cause meningoencephalitis, it can infect almost any organ of the human body, with pulmonary infection being the second most common disease manifestation. In cases of meningitis, symptom onset may be insidious, but headaches, fevers, or mental status changes should warrant diagnostic testing. Symptoms of pulmonary disease are nonspecific and may include fever, chills, cough, malaise, night swe...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Conclusion: Concurrent infection with cryptococcosis and MAC is extremely rare even in immunosuppressed patients. In our case, the concurrent infection was associated with a prolonged course of therapy during the induction phase for cryptococcosis. PMID: 31258430 [PubMed]
Source: Ochsner Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Ochsner J Source Type: research
This study demonstrates a clear correlation between serum cryptococcal antigen titre and meningitis. While the serum titre is not definitive for meningitis, in resource-limited settings or cases where lumbar puncture may be contraindicated, this evidence may aid diagnosis and subsequent therapeutic decisions. PMID: 30136919 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: ICL is a rare entity, with Cryptococcal meningitis being one of the more common opportunistic infections associated with this uncommonly seen syndrome. While there is no standard treatment for ICL, early management of infections may improve the degree of CD4+ lymphopenia. Prognosis is variable and depends on the extent of immunosuppression. Our case shows in a patient with ICL, early diagnosis and management of Cryptococcus neoformans may promote neurological recovery.Disclosure: Dr. Mannel has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Fungal and Other Infectious Disorders Source Type: research
Conclusions. CrAg screening of individuals initiating ART and preemptive fluconazole treatment of CrAg-positive patients resulted in markedly fewer cases of CM compared with historic unscreened cohorts. Studies are needed to refine management of CrAg-positive patients who have high mortality that does not appear to be wholly attributable to cryptococcal disease.
Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: ARTICLES AND COMMENTARIES Source Type: research
ConclusionsLaryngeal cryptococcosis is a rare cause of persistent hoarseness. Most patients have complete resolution after treatment. For complex and obstructive cases, laser ablation coupled with antifungal therapy can successfully manage laryngeal cryptococcosis in select patients. Level of EvidenceNA Laryngoscope, 2015
Source: The Laryngoscope - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Laryngology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Pleural effusion is an unusual manifestation of cryptococcosis. Cryptococcal infection must be considered in the case of patients on immunosuppressives, especially solid-organ transplant recipients, who present with pleural effusion, even if pleural fluid culture is negative. Close communication between the pathologist and the clinician, multiple special biopsy section stains and careful review are important and may contribute to decreasing misdiagnosis.
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
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