Exoskeletons: Robotic Structures Making Paralyzed People Walk Again

A paraplegic man made the first kick of the World Cup in Brazil in 2014; another paralyzed man was able to move all four of his limbs through mind-control, and yet another could walk down the aisle with the love of his life due to robotic structures called exoskeletons. These are just a few mind-blowing and heart-warming stories about their current power, but they haven’t reached their full potential yet. We looked around what exoskeleton technology can do today and what it promises for tomorrow. Exoskeleton becomes as real as a donut Remember the huge mechanic beasts fighting against the indigenous people on moon Pandora in Avatar? Or what about Tom Cruise extending his powers by exosuits in The Edge of Tomorrow or Matt Damon ‘getting a way out’ by turning into a robotic structure himself in Elysium? Science fiction movies fantasized about ways to give fragile humans more muscle power, protection, and endurance through metallic solutions for years – until they finally appeared in the form of exoskeletons. These are basically robotic structures that are attached to the joints in order to substitute muscle power when it’s needed. The mobile frameworks contain a computer in the backpack that can power the robotic components for hours. Their aim is to provide back, shoulder, waist, and thigh support, sense the user’s motion, and assist movement for lifting and holding heavy items while lowering back stress. The first prototypes couldn...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Robotics digital health exoskeleton science fiction technology exoskeletons rehabilitation paralyzed stroke injury spinal cord exoskeleton technology Source Type: blogs

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In conclusion, using a large cohort with rich health and DNA methylation data, we provide the first comparison of six major epigenetic measures of biological ageing with respect to their associations with leading causes of mortality and disease burden. DNAm GrimAge outperformed the other measures in its associations with disease data and associated clinical traits. This may suggest that predicting mortality, rather than age or homeostatic characteristics, may be more informative for common disease prediction. Thus, proteomic-based methods (as utilised by DNAm GrimAge) using large, physiologically diverse protein sets for p...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
This article presents challenges and solutions to ensure that South Africa can meet WHO 2030 Rehabilitation Goals for equitable provision of effective public rehabilitation services using the WHO's health system building block framework. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION To meet the challenge of providing rehabilitation for those in need requires country-specific, strategic, evidence-informed, and planned decisions in terms of best investment for highest return. Whilst there is sound international evidence for best-practice rehabilitation care, country-specific strategies are required to identify and address local barriers t...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Conclusion and Future Aspects This review summarizes available NTF expression data, compiles existing evidence on the effects of glial NTF signaling in healthy conditions and in disease models (Figure 1), and highlights the importance of this topic for future studies. The relationship between NTFs and glia is crucial for both the developing and adult brain. While some of these factors, such as NT-3 and CNTF, have highly potent effects on gliogenesis, others like BDNF and GDNF, are important for glia-mediated synapse formation. Neurotrophic factors play significant roles during neurodegenerative disorders. In many cases, ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion Recent advances in research on HTLV-1 provide better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of HAM/TSP, and several clinical trials of novel therapies for patients with HAM/TSP have been initiated. However, long-term improvement of motor disability and quality of life still have not been achieved in HAM/TSP patients, and the clinical management remains challenging. Given that HAM/TSP is characterized by activated T-cells in both the periphery and CNS, studies in HAM/TSP will be highly informative for clarifying the pathogenesis of other neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis....
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
by Jessica Robinson-Papp, MD, MS; Mary Catherine George, MM, PhD; Alexandra Nmashie, MD; Donald Weisz, PhD; and David M. Simpson, MD Drs. Robinson-Papp, George, Nmashie and Simpson are with the Department of Neurology and Dr. Weisz is with the Department of Neurosurgery—all from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, New York. Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;15(1–2):28–32 FUNDING: This investigator-initiated project was supported by a grant from CSL Behring. The project was also supported by Grant Number #UL1TR000067 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), a comp...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Assessment Tools Current Issue Demyelinating Disease Movement Disorders Neurodegenerative Disease Neurology Original Research Primary Care Technology Trial Methodology Dynamometry human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immu Source Type: research
Myomo, a medical robotics firm based in Cambridge, MA, has developed the MyoPro Motion-G, a powered rigid brace designed to support an arm that is weak or deformed by neurologic impairments such as stroke or brachial plexus injuries. The MyoPro can h...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Exclusive Rehab Source Type: blogs
This week in San Diego, Singularity University is holding its Exponential Medicine Conference, a look at how technologists are redesigning and rebuilding today's broken healthcare system. Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare. This blog is about why the $3 trillion healthcare system is broken and how we are going to fix it. First, the Bad News: Doctors spend $210 billion per year on procedures that aren’t based on patient need, but fear of liability. Americans spend, on average, $8,915 per person on healthcare – more than any other count...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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