Stopping live vaccines after disease eradication may increase mortality.

Stopping live vaccines after disease eradication may increase mortality. Vaccine. 2019 Oct 21;: Authors: Aaby P, Benn CS Abstract Several live vaccines may have beneficial non-specific effects (NSEs) reducing mortality more than can be explained by the prevention of the target infection, a phenomenon which has been linked to innate immune training. Most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of oral polio vaccine (OPV) and measles vaccine (MV) have shown a large reduction in mortality that must have been at least partly nonspecific because it was much larger than the reduction explained by prevention of the target disease. Hence, stopping a live vaccine after disease-eradication could have negative health effects if the potential beneficial NSEs are not considered. We reviewed one eradicated disease, smallpox, and two infections likely to be eradicated in coming decades, polio and measles. No study was made of unintended effects of stopping smallpox vaccination when it happened in 1980. We have subsequently documented in both Guinea-Bissau and Denmark that smallpox-vaccinated individuals continued to have a survival advantage long after smallpox had been eradicated. The few studies which have examined the effect of OPV on survival all suggest strong beneficial NSEs; in RCTs, OPV compared with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) has been associated with non-specific reductions in morbidity. RCTs, natural experiments and observational studies have found strong be...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research

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Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized History onetime Source Type: news
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Source: Public Health Reports - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rep Source Type: research
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Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
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