Boston Hospital Completes First African American Full Facial Transplant

BOSTON (CNN) — Robert Chelsea just got a new face, and with it, he is the latest milestone in the burgeoning world of facial transplant surgery. He is the first African American to receive a full facial transplant, with a successful surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. A black patient in Paris received a partial face transplant in 2007. At 68 years old, he’s the oldest person to undergo the surgery as well. “It’s a great wonder,” Chelsea told CNN in a phone interview on Friday. “This whole process gave me a whole new dimension on seeing myself.” After the standard three months of monitoring in Boston after the procedure, Chelsea just returned home to Los Angeles. He’s the 15th facial transplant patient in the US. “Despite being the oldest face transplant patient at 68, Robert is progressing and recovering remarkably fast,” lead surgeon Bohdan Pomahac said in a press release. Robert Chelsea is the first African American to receive a full facial transplant, with a successful surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston ( Photo Credit: Lightchaser Photography/Brigham and Women’s Hospital) He suffered severe burns in a car accident In August 2013, Chelsea was driving to church in the fast lane on a summer night when his car overheated. He was on the side of the Interstate when a drunken driver collided with his vehicle. “My car went up in the air, and when it came down, it blew ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Offbeat Syndicated CBSN Boston Brigham and Women's Hospital Source Type: news

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You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: This study revealed that admission hyperglycemia in the patients with thoracoabdominal injuries had a higher mortality rate than NDN patients with or without adjusting the differences in patient’s age, sex, comorbidities, and injury severity.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Army veteran Eugene Milligan is 75 years old and blind. He uses a wheelchair since losing half his right leg to diabetes and gets dialysis for kidney failure. And he has struggled to get enough to eat. Earlier this year, he ended up in the hospital after burning himself while boiling water for oatmeal. The long stay caused the Memphis vet to fall off a charity’s rolls for home-delivered Meals on Wheels, so he had to rely on others, such as his son, a generous off-duty nurse and a local church to bring him food. “Many times, I’ve felt like I was starving,” he says. “There’s neighbors that...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging politics Source Type: news
Conclusion: Using a largely theoretical model, the six modifiable lifestyle factors were estimated to be attributable to 50.9% of dementia cases in Barbados. Since the risk factors have much in common, any intervention that targets one of them could significantly reduce future dementia prevalence. PMID: 31093046 [PubMed]
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
Conclusions The clinical trials discussed here, which include several trials investigating novel therapeutic targets, demonstrate that translational research in pemphigus and pemphigoid is a fast-growing field. We thus expect that several novel treatments will be shortly available for the treatment of pemphigus and pemphigoid patients. Given the high, and thus far unmet, medical need in this field (110), this is highly encouraging and will hopefully improve the quality of life of the affected patients. In addition to the compounds and targets described here, several new targets have been recently identified in preclinical...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Hongfei Gu1†, Shuang Shao2†, Jie Liu3,4,5, Zhenqian Fan2, Yu Chen2, Jingxian Ni3,4,5, Conglin Wang6, Jun Tu3,4,5, Xianjia Ning3,4,5, Yongzhong Lou1*, Bin Li1* and Jinghua Wang3,4,5* 1Department of Neurology, Tianjin Haibin People's Hospital, Tianjin, China 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 3Department of Neurology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China 4Laboratory of Epidemiology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin, China 5Key Laboratory of Post-Neuroinjury Neuro-Repair and Regeneration i...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion γPGA-producing Bacillus spp. were isolated during fermentation of OSL and LOSL at 0–12 h. These isolates exhibited antibacterial and ACE inhibitory activities at different concentrations. The individual antibacterial activities of γPGA were bacteriostatic while the combined use exhibited bactericidal characteristics. Although the ACE inhibitory activities were low, OSL and LOSL are promising sources for developing functional microorganisms with a beneficial impact on health. The importance lies in the benefits derived from the use of local resources. Author Contributions TA contributed to th...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Anna M. D. Watson1,2*, Eleanor A. M. Gould2, Sally A. Penfold2, Gavin W. Lambert2,3, Putra Riza Pratama2, Aozhi Dai1, Stephen P. Gray2, Geoffrey A. Head2† and Karin A. Jandeleit-Dahm1,2† 1Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 3Iverson Health Innovation Research Institute, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia Patients with diabetic hypertensive nephropathy have accelerated ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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