Can You Form an Addiction to Suboxone?

Can You Form an Addiction to Suboxone? While Suboxone can be a helpful tool for many, it is important to also understand its addictive nature. Because it is an opioid, wondering if you can form an addiction to Suboxone can be answered simply: Yes. Although the rates of addiction are much smaller than those of other opioids, it is still important to take their addictive properties seriously and get help if you start to notice the signs and symptoms of addiction to Suboxone. What is Suboxone? According to their own website, Suboxone is a prescription medicine that contains the active ingredients buprenorphine and naloxone. It is used to treat adults who are dependent on (addicted to) opioids (either prescription or illegal). In addition, it is indicated for the treatment of opioid dependence and should be used as part of a complete treatment plan to include counseling and psychosocial support. How Does Suboxone Work? Suboxone is a blend of two other medications: buprenorphine and naloxone. It is a man-made drug and is used to replace much more harmful opioid drugs. Since it is milder, people are able to more safely wean off of opioids to the point of eventually becoming sober. This helps the patient experience minimal withdrawal symptoms and have a more pleasant detox experience as opposed to quitting “cold turkey”. According to their own website, these two ingredients work together by: Buprenorphine is a partial agonist, and it can attach to the same receptors as ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Substance Abuse addiction treatment addictionologist detox drug detox medical detox medicated-assisted detox prescription drug detox prescription medication suboxone Source Type: blogs

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Cliffside Malibu does not condone the use of the term “addict” when referring to people suffering from the disorder of addiction. However, we do understand that others still may use the term in order to find information. Many people may find themselves asking the question, “am I an opioid addict?” if they feel as if their use has spiraled out of control. There are many ways to find out if you may have become addicted to opioids, as well as ways to get help and find treatment. How Opioid Addiction Begins Nearly 80% of heroin users started with prescription opioids, which puts prescription drugs and ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals addiction treatment opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment Source Type: blogs
The largest risks that come with using opioids are addiction and overdose. An overdose occurs when the body has received too much of a substance or a combination of substances. An opioid overdose can be fatal, which makes it important for all individuals to know the signs of one and what to do if it happens. What Happens During an Opioid Overdose? Opioid overdose can occur at any time, even if the opioids are being used as directed and as prescribed. Doctors can accidentally over-prescribe medications or the body can have a reaction that wasn’t expected. Opioids are a depressant, meaning they slow down the central n...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse drug overdose heroin addiction heroin users opiates opioid opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription medication Source Type: blogs
On average, 130 Americans die from an opioid overdose every day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers opioid overdose an epidemic in the United States, estimating it responsible for nearly 68 percent of 70,000 drug-related deaths in 2017. Understanding the effects of opioids can prevent opioid overdose, and knowing the opioid overdose signs can save lives. What Are Opioids? Opioids are a class of drugs naturally found in the opium poppy plant. Opioid drugs reduce pain by binding to opioid receptors in your brain, spinal cord and other areas of the body, creating morphine-like effects. The CDC ide...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse drug overdose opiate opiate abuse opiate addiction opiates opioid opioids Source Type: blogs
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs
With all the news media accounts and reports from governmental health organizations about the opioid epidemic, including the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in 2017, a newly emerging threat is gaining attention: use and misuse of benzodiazepines, opioid drugs and Z-drugs. Specifically, combining these three drugs can create a deadly combination that snuffs out lives. Benzodiazepine Overdose Deaths on the Rise Benzodiazepines, a class of sedative narcotic drugs including Xanax and Valium used to treat anxiety, insomnia and other disorders and classified as Schedule IV under the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Enforcement ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Suicide Source Type: news
What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs
‚ÄčThe atomizer is a handy tool to instill life-saving medication into the nose, and you should consider stocking them if you don't already. An atomizer can be used to administer naloxone and countless other drugs as well as for moderate sedation and pain control. Pediatric and adult patients alike can benefit from intranasal fentanyl or Versed. Studies on intranasal epinephrine for anaphylaxis also look promising, but it does require a higher dose—5 mg instead of 0.3 mg. (Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016;34[1]:38; http://bit.ly/2Prpjhb.)The atomizer is easy to use and can be attached to any syringe. Each spray creat...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news
Conclusion Using the three Cs of risk management strategies—collecting information, communicating, and carefully documenting—when prescribing controlled substances supports quality patient care and can decrease the risk of improper prescribing allegations. Appendix 1. Prescribing Controlled Substances: Informed Consent Some, but not all states have promulgated various requirements and recommendations for components of an informed consent discussion when prescribing controlled substances.  The following is a compilation of current individual state requirements and recommendations for informed consent. ...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Risk Management Source Type: research
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is pleased to announce a partnership with the NIH All of Us Research Program (All of Us), part of the Precision Medicine Initiative. Through this collaboration, NNLM’s Regional Medical Libraries and National Offices will focus on improving consumer access to high quality health information in communities throughout the U.S., specifically, by working with public libraries. Check out the Fall 2017 issue of the MAReport! This quarter, Lydia Collins discusses “Rai...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
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