Don't carry the weight of the world on your shoulders: Study finds link between "inflated responsibility" and greater risk of developing OCD or anxiety disorders

(Natural News) Having a sense of responsibility is important, but too much can be detrimental to a person’s mental health. In a preliminary study published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, researchers from Japan and the U.S. found that having intense feelings of responsibility can potentially develop anxiety disorders, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and general...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This study aimed to identify predictors of relapse of anxiety after CBT for adult (18+) patients to enable the identification of "at-risk" patients who could potentially benefit from relapse prevention interventions. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted, including studies found in PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and through hand-searches of references lists and reverse citations. Nine studies met eligibility criteria (N = 532 patients). On average, 23.8% of patients experienced relapse following completion of CBT. A total of 21 predictors were identified and grouped into seven catego...
Source: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Cogn Behav Ther Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 July 2020Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Danielle E. Katz, Judith M. Laposa, Neil A. Rector
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionHigher levels of baseline AS negatively impact response to CBT for OCD.
Source: Cognitive Therapy and Research - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
You're reading Overcoming Atelophobia, the Fear of Being Imperfect, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. What is your biggest irrational fear? For many, it’s the fear of snakes, spiders, heights, or closed spaces. But for others, their greatest fear is not being perfect. If you are constantly stressed by the pursuit of perfection or find your perfectionism to be paralyzing, you may have atelophobia. Learn how this extreme form of perfectionism can diminish your life and health, and what you c...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness psychology antelophobia mental health self improvement Source Type: blogs
AbstractLittle is known about the role of mindfulness and self-compassion in obsessive-compulsive disorder. This cross-sectional study examined associations of mindfulness and self-compassion with obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and with the obsessive beliefs and low distress tolerance thought to maintain them. Samples of treatment-seeking adults (N  =  1871) and non-treatment-seeking adults (N  =  540) completed mindfulness, self-compassion, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, depression, obsessive beliefs and distress tolerance questionnaires. Participants with clinically significan...
Source: Cognitive Therapy and Research - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 August 2019Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Tamara Leeuwerik, Kate Cavanagh, Clara StraussAbstractWhilst Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), around half of the participants do not experience remission following treatment. As yet, there is no comprehensive systematic review of the extent to which patient non-adherence presents a challenge to the overall benefit of CBT for OCD. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to identify the magnitude, moderators and reasons for poor patient adherenc...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There is limited evidence from randomised controlled trials which supports claims that computer- or Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders is not inferior to in-person delivery. Randomised controlled trials properly designed to test non-inferiority are needed before conclusions about the relative benefits of in-person and Internet- and computer-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy can be made. PROSPERO: CRD420180961655-6. PMID: 31339342 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2019Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Bethany M. Wootton, Eyal Karin, Nick Titov, Blake F. DearAbstractInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been demonstrated to be efficacious across multiple clinical trials. However, most of these interventions include clinician support, and many individuals with OCD prefer to manage their own symptoms. Self-guided ICBT overcomes this problem, but to date the efficacy of self-guided interventions has only been studied in uncontrolled trials. The present study aims to examine ...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionReassurance seeking appears to be a common factor across anxiety disorders though the themes of the reassurance may differ. Further, reduction in excessive reassurance seeking may be an important component in treatment outcome.
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Abstract How best to support mental health of young people is an important public health challenge. More empirical researches are need to examine the relationship between mindfulness-based interventions and mental health in China. The present study reports results from a quasi-experiment following a one-group repeated-measures design which investigated the impact of a standard 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) program in 81 Chinese undergraduates (14 males, 67 females, age 20.35 ± 1.35 years). Data was collected using the Symptom Check List 90 (SCL90) at baseline, week 3, ...
Source: Community Mental Health Journal - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Community Ment Health J Source Type: research
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