Scientists Were Hunting for the Next Ebola. Now the U.S. Has Cut Off Their Funding.

Predict, a government research program, sought to identify animal viruses that might infect humans and to head off new pandemics.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Epidemics United States Agency for International Development Animals Livestock Diseases Bats United States Politics and Government Federal Budget (US) Ebola Virus Avian Influenza Infections Pigs Monkeys and Apes Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: June 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 23Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. PfeifferAbstractMathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions. Howeve...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 22Author(s): Pierre Nouvellet, Anne Cori, Tini Garske, Isobel M. Blake, Ilaria Dorigatti, Wes Hinsley, Thibaut Jombart, Harriet L. Mills, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Maria D. Van Kerkhove, Christophe Fraser, Christl A. Donnelly, Neil M. Ferguson, Steven RileyAbstractOutbreaks of novel pathogens such as SARS, pandemic influenza and Ebola require substantial investments in reactive interventions, with consequent implementation plans sometimes revised on a weekly basis. Therefore, short-term forecasts of incidence are often of high priority. In light of the recent Ebola epidemic...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 23Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. PfeifferAbstractMathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions. Howeve...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 22Author(s): Pierre Nouvellet, Anne Cori, Tini Garske, Isobel M. Blake, Ilaria Dorigatti, Wes Hinsley, Thibaut Jombart, Harriet L. Mills, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Maria D. Van Kerkhove, Christophe Fraser, Christl A. Donnelly, Neil M. Ferguson, Steven RileyAbstractOutbreaks of novel pathogens such as SARS, pandemic influenza and Ebola require substantial investments in reactive interventions, with consequent implementation plans sometimes revised on a weekly basis. Therefore, short-term forecasts of incidence are often of high priority. In light of the recent Ebola epidemic...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017 Source:Epidemics Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. Pfeiffer Mathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017 Source:Epidemics Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. Pfeiffer Mathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
World Health Organization. 02/2017 This introductory level online course aims to equip frontline responders with the latest know-how to manage outbreaks of known and emerging epidemic-prone diseases in the 21st century. It focuses on 13 infectious hazards, offering the most relevant scientific, technical, and operational knowledge through video presentations and self-tests. Diseases discussed include Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), pandemic influenza, yellow fever, and Zika. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration.
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
Authors: Blakiston M, Heffernan H, Roberts S, Freeman J Abstract Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in general poses a threat to the sustainability of modern healthcare, but a particularly urgent and serious threat is posed by a specific group of antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). CPE are resistant to nearly all antibiotics and include common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In New Zealand, the incidence of CPE has increased from three isolates in 2012 to 45 in 2016. The current epidemiology of CPE in New Zealand has similarities with th...
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: Journals (General) Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
More News: Bird Flu | Budgets | Ebola | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Flu Pandemic | Funding | Government | Health | Influenza | Pandemics | Politics | USA Health