Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children Born With Esophageal Atresia Using pH and Impedance Monitoring

Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate acid and nonacid gastroesophageal reflux in infants and school-aged children with esophageal atresia (EA) using pH-impedance (pH-MII) monitoring. Methods: Between 2012 and 2017, all 24-hour pH-MII studies performed in infants (≤18 months) and 8-year olds with EA were included. Antiacid therapy was discontinued before study. Exclusion criteria were: isolated tracheoesophageal fistula; esophageal replacement therapy; tube feeding; and monitoring
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Articles: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

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Conclusion: Using a sling of the linea alba around the cardioesophageal junction, prevents gastroesophageal reflux and escape of air from esophagus into the stomach, gives time to improve the respiratory and nutritional status of the patient, for a subsequent safer delayed primary anastomosis.
Source: Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: Surgery (Oxford)Author(s): Spencer W. BeasleyAbstractOesophageal atresia and tracheo-oesophageal fistula is a congenital structural abnormality that affects 1:4500 live infants. It is due to failure of the primitive foregut tube to separate correctly into oesophagus and trachea. About 50% have associated abnormalities, of which the VACTERL (Vertebral, Anorectal, Cardiac, Tracheo-oEsophageal, Renal and Limb) association is the most common. Prematurity is common and all have some degree of tracheomalacia. Surgery of the common type can be performed through a fourth in...
Source: Surgery (Oxford) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Discussion Respiratory problems in infants can caused by many things including any type of obstruction from the nose to lung. Neonates and infants are particularly susceptible to changes in the size of the airway because of the physics of airflow resistance. Important reminders about infant airways: Resistance = 1/radius4 (Poiseuille’s equation) therefore even a 1 mm decrease in the airway circumferences increases the airflow resistance x16. Increased airflow causes less pressure along the walls, which can lead to collapse of the walls (Bernoulli’s and Venturi effects). Neonates have smaller lungs relative to ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Although BE is considered a premalignant condition; incidence of carcinoma in pediatric population is low. Long-term follow-up with endoscopies and biopsies seems to be advisable for BE evidence and malignant alterations. PMID: 29992379 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: World Journal of Pediatrics : WJP - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: World J Pediatr Source Type: research
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry - Category: Dentistry Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Long-term follow-up of patients with EA ± TEF indicates a high burden of co-morbidities during the first 6 years of life, with a gradual decrease in symptoms thereafter. Nevertheless, HRAD continued to impact the daily life of about one-third of the older adolescents, and GERD one-fifth. A long-term multidisciplinary follow-up should be conducted to prevent late onset complications that may affect the quality of life. PMID: 29527854 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Israel Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Isr Med Assoc J Source Type: research
Conclusions: Close follow-up and multidisciplinary approach is recommended in children with EA-TEF, even after corrective surgery
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Paediatric Bronchology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewGuidelines were recently published highlighting why esophageal atresia (EA) patients are prone to complication risks, and the need for long-term follow-up. In this review, we will focus on how to investigate and treat potential complications, as well as the pros and cons of different investigative and treatment modalities, and what areas continue to need further research.Recent FindingsEA patients are at high risk for gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal strictures, and the sequela that result. Extraintestinal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can appear similar to other pa...
Source: Current Gastroenterology Reports - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionsCompared with OR, a longer operative time was associated within TR group, although the TR procedure could possibly reduce the length of hospital stay and first oral feeding time. Meanwhile, the occurrence rate for leaks, strictures, pulmonary complications, and the fundoplication rate of GERD, and blood loss were similar between the OR and TR groups. Estimated result of ventilation time between the two groups remained ambiguous.
Source: Pediatric Surgery International - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur study confirms that respiratory symptoms often complicate EA and TEF; their persistence despite medical and surgical treatment of GER means that other etiological hypothesis must be examined and that a complete respiratory diagnostic work up must be considered.
Source: Italian Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
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