Technology May Make The Stethoscope Obsolete

BOSTON (CBS) — The stethoscope has been a “tried and true” tool for doctors and nurses for two centuries, but it may soon become obsolete. According to reporting by the Associated Press, new devices may take its place: digital versions that can pair with smartphones and handheld ultrasound scanners than can show the heart in action, leaky valves and all. Advances in artificial intelligence can also help providers interpret what they’re hearing and seeing on the spot. Within a decade, you may see your doctor walk in the room with an ultrasound in her pocket rather than a stethoscope around her neck.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Tech Dr. Mallika Marshall Medical News Technology Source Type: news

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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
CHICAGO (AP) — Two centuries after its invention, the stethoscope — the very symbol of the medical profession — is facing an uncertain prognosis. It is threatened by hand-held devices that are also pressed against the chest but rely on ultrasound technology, artificial intelligence and smartphone apps instead of doctors’ ears to help detect leaks, murmurs, abnormal rhythms and other problems in the heart, lungs and elsewhere. Some of these instruments can yield images of the beating heart or create electrocardiogram graphs. Dr. Eric Topol, a world-renowned cardiologist, considers the stethoscope obs...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized technology Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on Medium here.
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