Acid reflux surgery could help prevent rejection in lung transplant patients

(Loyola University Health System) A procedure to treat acid reflux could help prevent chronic rejection in lung transplant patients, according to a study published in the American College of Surgeons.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Increased BET on MII-pH is an independent predictor of poor pulmonary outcome over 1 year in IPF patients. PMID: 29969857 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: J Neurogastroenterol Motil Source Type: research
Authors: Ruiz de León San Juan A Abstract Lung transplants belong in the group of organ transplants with poorer outcomes, with acute rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans being cited as major causes of this. Poor allograft evolution has been associated with multiple factors, including those related to esophagogastric disease. In patients with end-stage pulmonary conditions eligible for a lung transplant gastroesophageal reflux (GER), esophageal dysmotily, and gastroparesis are highly prevalent and worsen upon transplantation, which may compromise transplant viability. High-resolution impedance manometry and...
Source: Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Rev Esp Enferm Dig Source Type: research
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: AGA Abstracts Source Type: research
ConclusionsGastrointestinal complications are not uncommon in LTx recipients and may be serious; therefore, early detection and appropriate treatment are imperative. Surgical management is required for some complications, but most can be managed medically.
Source: Surgery Today - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Gastro-esophageal reflux and bile acids (BAs) aspiration is associated to chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). We investigated for the first time the reactivity of small airways to a comprehensive panel of BAs as detected in post lung transplant bronchial washings.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux and bile acid aspiration are risk factors for chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Bile acids may compromise the broncho-alveolar innate immunity by deranging the lipid surface barrier and/or by directly modulating macrophage activity. Targeted bile acid metabolomics and bacterial, fungal and viral cultures were investigated in post lung transplant surveillance bronchial washings.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Long-term outcomes after lung transplantation remain suboptimal. Although the 1-year survival is nearly 80%, the 5-year survival is closer to 50%, which is significantly less than for other solid organ transplants.1 Chronic lung allograft dysfunction and its clinical equivalent, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, account for the leading cause of graft dysfunction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease has been suggested to be a non –immune related cause in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial commentary Source Type: research
The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) represents a topic of keen interest to thoracic surgeons, highlighting the interplay between 2 areas of our surgical repertoire: benign esophageal disease and end-stage lung failure. Although a number of contributing factors have been identified in the development and progression of BOS,1,2 GERD may importantly be one cause that is modifiable.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial commentary Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent after lung transplantation. Fundoplication slows lung function decline in patients with GERD, but the optimal timing of fundoplication is unknown.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Transplantation Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent after lung transplantation. Fundoplication slows lung function decline in patients with GERD, but the optimal timing of fundoplication is unknown.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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