Treating Periodontitis Reduces Inflammatory Markers and Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

Researchers here provide evidence for periodontitis, gum disease, to contribute to hypertension, chronic raised blood pressure, via inflammatory mechanisms. Aggressively treating the periodontitis in hypertensive patients reduces both blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Periodontitis has previously been linked with a modestly increased risk of dementia, as well as increased cardiovascular mortality risk. In both cases, increased inflammation is strongly suspected to be the linking mechanism. Experimental and observational clinical evidence suggests a prominent role of inflammation in the development of hypertension. In particular, activation of immune cells has been demonstrated in hypertension. Hypertension is more prevalent in patients with immune-mediated disorders, such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, chronic inflammatory disorders, could provide a substrate for the pro-hypertensive inflammation. Periodontitis is one of the most common inflammatory conditions worldwide, representing the sixth most prevalent condition worldwide with prevalence of 20-50%. It is linked to cardiovascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, if causally associated, periodontitis could significantly contribute to the global hypertensive burden and interventions targeting oral inflammation would have an important role in the prevention of hypertension and its complications. Observational evidence suggests that modera...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionsIn this high-risk low-income cohort, contributions of risk factors to HF varied, particularly by race. To reduce the population burden of HF, interventions tailored for specific race and sex groups may be warranted.Graphical abstract
Source: JACC: Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2019Source: Global Heart, Volume 14, Issue 4Author(s): Ruth Webster, Gary Parker, Stephane Heritier, Rohina Joshi, Karen Yeates, Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo, J. Jaime Miranda, Brian Oldenburg, Bruce Ovbiagele, Mayowa Owolabi, David Peiris, Devarsetty Praveen, Abdul Salam, Jon-David Schwalm, K.R. Thankappan, Nihal Thomas, Sheldon Tobe, Rajesh Vedanthan
Source: Global Heart - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Global Heart - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Blood Pressure Monitoring - Category: Cardiology Tags: Clinical Methods and Pathophysiology Source Type: research
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Source: Blood Pressure Monitoring - Category: Cardiology Tags: Clinical Methods and Pathophysiology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bread gluten grains oprah Weight Loss weight watchers Source Type: blogs
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories celiac gluten grains Inflammation Source Type: blogs
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Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anecdotal Treatments HONEST MEDICINE Integrative Medicine Low Dose Naltrexone Obituaries Source Type: blogs
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