Featured review: What are the effects of fluoxetine treatment in overweight or obese adults?

Fluoxetine is a medicine used for the treatment of depression, which reduces appetite as a side effect. Therefore, it is suspected that fluoxetine could be used as a treatment for overweight or obese people. In this group of people administration of fluoxetine means an off-label treatment which means it is not licensed for treating obesity.The authors identified 19 randomised controlled trials (clinical studies where people are randomly put into one of two or more treatment groups) evaluating mainly women receiving different doses of fluoxetine. A total of 1280 overweight or obese participants received fluoxetine and 936 participants received mainly  placebo or another anti-obesity medication. The participants in the included studies were followed up for periods varying between three weeks and one year.For our main comparison group — fluoxetine compared with placebo — and for all fluoxetine doses there was a 2.7 kg weight loss in favour of fluoxetine. The authors are uncertain, however, if an additional study would show a benefit for fluoxetine again. A total of 399 out of 627 participants (63.6%) receiving fluoxetine compared with 352 out of 626 participants (56.2%) receiving placebo experienced a side effect. Dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, insomnia and nausea were observed approximately twice as often after fluoxetine compared to placebo. A total of 15 out of 197 participants (7.6%) receiving fluoxetine comp ared with 12 ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news

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AbstractAims/hypothesisThe aim of this study was to use Mendelian randomisation (MR) to identify the causal risk factors for type 2 diabetes.MethodsWe first conducted a review of meta-analyses and review articles to pinpoint possible risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Around 170 possible risk factors were identified of which 97 risk factors with available genetic instrumental variables were included in MR analyses. To reveal more risk factors that were not included in our MR analyses, we conducted a review of published MR studies of type 2 diabetes. For our MR analyses, we used summary-level data from the DIAbetes Genetics ...
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study showed an association between reduced REM and increased mortality, but it did not demonstrate the cause of the association. REM deprivation could independently contribute to the development of numerous other diseases. The results apply more clearly to older adults, given that the age groups studied averaged in the 50s and 70s. Short REM may also be a marker of a sick or aging brain; less REM sleep has already been tied to a greater risk of dementia. Overall, ensuring adequate REM sleep is important to protecting your long-term health. Getting better sleep in middle age and beyond Maintaining good sleep should re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Fatigue Memory Sleep Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: At time of NC diagnosis, children have more frequent obesity, night eating, parasomnia, sleep talking, drunkenness, and ADHD symptoms than adults, even if sleepiness and cataplexy do not differ. These differences should be considered to ensure a prompt diagnosis. PMID: 32761857 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: CNS Neurosci Ther Source Type: research
No doubt we live in stressful times. Political and social unrest and a pandemic are piling on top of the normal stresses of daily life. Undue stress can lead to insomnia, fatigue, headaches, depression, and serious medical conditions. If you feel severely overwhelmed, it might be wise to consult a doctor. But there are six simple ways to combat stress on your own. 1. Go Outside and Take a Breath Researchers know a breath of fresh air cleanses contaminants from your lungs. They also know your brain uses about 20% of the oxygen you take in, so the more air you get, the better your mind functions – and that mak...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured productivity tips psychology self-improvement motivation pickthebrain stress stress management Source Type: blogs
This study supports a comprehensive approach to evaluation and treatment of mild OSA. While all people with mild OSA may not need to be treated with CPAP, there are patients who can greatly benefit from it. Treatments may be trial and error until you and your doctor get it right When sleep apnea is mild, treatment recommendations are less clear-cut, and should be determined based on the severity of your symptoms, your preferences, and other co-occurring health problems. Working in conjunction with your doctor, you can try a stepwise approach — if one treatment doesn’t work, you can stop that and try an alternat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Trials of antidepressants may be driven mainly by commercial interests, focusing on prevalent diseases and everyday problems. No one can live a full life without experiencing several of the problems for which these drugs were tested. Antidepressants, sometimes called happy pills, could be seen as the modern version of Aldous Huxley's soma pill intended to keep everyone happy in the "Brave New World". PMID: 32444565 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Int J Risk Saf Med Source Type: research
By Emma Young We all know that too little sleep is bad for us. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley sleep scientist and author of the best-selling Why We Sleep, has gone so far as to declare: “The shorter you sleep, the shorter your life.” However, some researchers fear that our concerns about not getting enough sleep are becoming overblown — and that, ironically, they could be making the problem worse. In this feature, we take a look at evidence that “too little” sleep isn’t always the disaster that it’s held up to be. It’s not always about a lack of sleep You’ll be fami...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs
This week’s Psychology Around the Net is, unsurprisingly, heavy on COVID-19 news. Get tips on how to build a psychological first aid kit, the latest on how coronavirus quarantine could affect different kids, ways your media consumption is traumatizing you, and more. Be well, friends! How to Build a “Psychological First Aid Kit”: The American Mountain Guides Association recently published “Stress and the Resilience for Coronavirus” which is a collection of mental health resources designed by Laura McGladrey, a National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) instructor. McGladrey is also a nurse prac...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Psychology Around the Net Autism Children coronavirus COVID-19 neurodivergent pandemic PTSD Source Type: blogs
In this study, the L-trp biosynthetic pathway was further integrated into the E. coli genome, and the promoter strength of 3-deoxy-7-phosphoheptulonate synthase, which catalyzes the first step of L-trp biosynthesis, was engineered to increase the production of L-trp. Hence, the 5-HTP production could be manipulated by the regulation of copy number of L-trp hydroxylation plasmid. Finally, the 5-HTP production was increased to 1.61 g/L in the shaking flasks, which was 24% improvement comparing to the original producing strain, while the content of residual L-trp was successfully reduced from 1.66 to 0.2 g/L, w...
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
This study found an association between stroke risk and longer sleep, longer midday napping, or poor sleep quality. But an association is not the same as causation. Rather than longer sleep duration causing strokes, there are other possible explanations for the findings. For example, people who sleep more at night or nap more during the day may have other risk factors for stroke, such as: A higher incidence of depression. Excessive sleeping or poor sleep quality may be symptoms of depression, and prior studies have noted higher stroke rates among depressed individuals. A more sedentary lifestyle. Those who are not active ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hypertension and Stroke Sleep Source Type: blogs
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