Cow ’s Milk and Vitamin D Supplementation in Infants

In this issue of JAMA Pediatrics, Urashima and colleagues ask whether very early (within 3 days of birth) exposure to cow ’s milk formula (CMF) (a common practice in Japan) and vitamin D supplementation (uncommon in Japan) lowers or increases the risk of developing food allergy (as determined by cow’s milk–specific IgE [CM-IgE] sensitization at 5 months and 2 years of age) in infants at risk of atopy (risk was de fined as having ≥1 of the father, mother, and/or siblings with current and/or past atopic diseases [eg, asthma]). In recent years, the approach for primary prevention of food allergy has changed dramatically. Earlier recommendations to delay the introduction of allergenic foods to 1 to 3 years of age have now been replaced by newer recommendations to introduce allergenic foods such as peanut and egg at 4 to 6 months of age, after a period of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). The World Health Organization and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EEACI) recommend EBF for a min imum of 6 months and 4 months, respectively. However, whether introduction of all typically allergic foods before 4 to 6 months can decrease risk of allergy is unclear. In the case of CM, this issue is of special importance because supplementation or replacement with formula, even in the first days of life, is not infrequent. Partially or extensively hydrolyzed formulas have been developed to reduce the allergenicity of CM. There is currently a lack of consen...
Source: JAMA Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS Identifying allergens is important for the diagnosis and management of allergic disorders, and for performing immunotherapy. PMID: 31676746 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Food allergy (FA) is a significant health concern affecting 5.6 million children in the US1 that typically presents as a child is introduced to new foods. The nine most prevalent food allergens among younger children are milk, peanut, egg, tree nut, shellfish, soy, fin fish, wheat, and sesame.1 Since dietary diversity tends to increase around the time children enter pre-K, it is critical early child care providers have the information necessary to manage existing or new food allergy reactions.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Purpose of review To analyze the status of precision medicine in atopic diseases. Recent findings Atopic diseases are increasingly recognized as heterogeneous in nature and they can be quite different in severity, response to therapy, triggers, genetic back ground, ancestral risk and type of inflammation. This significant variability in the landscape of atopic diseases is not reflected in the common treatment guidelines that follow ‘one fits all’ approach for their management. Such an approach is largely based on minimal ‘phenotype’ elements, such as severity of disease and response to therapy ...
Source: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: PRECISION MEDICINE Source Type: research
PMID: 31698094 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 October 2019Source: Genes &DiseasesAuthor(s): Wei Wang, Tianhao Yao, Tianyi Zhang, Meiying Quan, Changyan Wang, Chen Wang, Lejia Zhang, Xiaoyan Tang, Shan Jian, Hongmei SongAbstractSelective immunoglobulin A deficiency (SIgAD) is considered to be the most common human primary immune-deficiency disease in the world. However, the incidence in China is obviously lower than Caucasian races. The definitionof SIgAD has changed over time with the progress of people's understanding. The scientific community did not reach a consensus on the definition until 1999. As a result, many previousl...
Source: Genes and Diseases - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Cow's Milk allergy (CMA) is the most common cause of food allergy in young children. Although a common problem in the pediatric population, some cases of CMA can be challenging in the setting of IgE mediated reactions and the risk of morbidity and mortality high.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Food allergy is common, with a reported prevalence in adults of up to 10%. Unintended exposures in food-allergic individuals can cause anaphylaxis. When individuals experience frequent episodes of anaphylaxis with unclear food triggers, it is imperative to evaluate for alternative causes. Comprehensive evaluation seeks objective evidence of anaphylaxis, and consideration of a broad differential diagnosis, including rare etiologies such as systemic mastocytosis.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Patient is a 9-year-old male with a history of moderate/severe atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). He initially presented to an outside gastroenterologist at 3 years of age due to poor growth and picky eating. He had an endoscopy performed, which demonstrated esophageal eosinophilia. At the time of EoE diagnosis, patient was without IgE mediated food allergies, specifically tolerating dairy products regularly without symptoms. His initial management of eosinophilic esophagitis included the 4-food elimination diet.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Known as the “diamond of the kitchen”, truffles are the fruiting body of the fungi genus Tuber. In an effort to duplicate this desired flavor, truffle flavoring is made by combining olive oil and the synthetic 2,4-dithiapentane (DTP).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Food Allergy Source Type: research
Although guidelines recommend screening to facilitate early (4-6 months of age) peanut Introduction in infants at highest risk of peanut allergy, numerous factors result in long wait times for allergist evaluation, delaying receipt of allergist guidance until nearly one year of age. Electronic consultations (e-consults) are asynchronous, virtual, clinician-to-clinician exchanges that have reduced wait times in adult allergy/immunology clinics but have not been studied in the context of infant food allergy.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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